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How Does the Reconciliation HCR Bill Compare on the Numbers?

March 18, 2010 - by Donny Shaw

After days of delay, the Congressional Budget Office has released their full scoring (.pdf) of the Reconciliation Act of 2010 (H.R.4872) that is designed to bridge the gap between the more conservative Senate version of the health care bill and the progressive House version. The reconciliation bill is designed to strike a balance between the two and, based on the numbers alone, it appears to achieve that, and it even supercedes the oher bills in a couple areas.

The numbers below are all for a ten-year budgeting outlook — they reflect estimates of what kind of impact the bill would have in 2019.

 

 

House Bill
Passed House 11/07/09 by a vote of 220-215

Senate Bill
Passed Senate 12/24/09 by a vote of 60 to 39
Reconciliation Bill
Amends the Senate bill, vote expected in House 3/21
Gross cost of coverage provisions $1.2 trillion
$875 billion  $940 billion
Net savings $138 billion $118 billion  $138 billion
Insurance coverage expansion 36 million more people would have coverage than under current law. In total, 94% of the population would be insured
31 million more people would have coverage than under current law. In total, 92% of the population would be insured  32 million more people would have coverage than under current law. In total, 95% of the population would be insured
Expansion of Medicaid 15 million Americans would be added to Medicaid 15 million Americans would be added to Medicaid 16 million Americans would be added to Medicaid
Number of American who would remain uninsured 18 million 24 million  23 million
Change in employer-provided insurance 6 million more people will get employer coverage 4 million fewer people would have employer coverage than under current law 4 million fewer people would have employer coverage than under current law
Average subsidy for people buying insurance with government aid $6,800 per year $5,800 per year

 $6,000 per year

 

We should have the full text of the reconciliation bill online later today. Stay tuned!

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Comments

  • lworley1 03/18/2010 8:34am

    I recently emailed my senators expressing my discontent with the current healthcare bill. However, I don’t really know enough about it and the opinion is based mainly on interpretation of media reports. Is there a summary of the current bill that is available for review?

  • lworley1 03/18/2010 8:35am

    I recently emailed my senators expressing my discontent with the current healthcare bill. However, I don’t really know enough about it and the opinion is based mainly on personal interpretation of media reports. Is there a summary of the current bill that is available for review?

  • Comm_reply
    donnyshaw 03/18/2010 10:13am

    OpenCongress Staff

    Yup. It’s posted here:

    http://www.opencongress.org/articles/view/1738-Summary-of-the-HCR-Reconciliation-Bill-

  • saloinc 03/18/2010 11:27am

    saloinc 3/18/2010 2:25

    Is there any tort reform in the current healthcare bill?

  • Godizincontrol 03/20/2010 4:43pm

    Did anyone mention that health care is a benefit, not a right? Why are we forcing healthcare on the people of America when no one is “entitled” to such a benefit? Health care is insurance, not as a dependent need.

  • JenniferK 03/21/2010 4:43pm

    Honestly I can’t see the benifit in the math. 32 million more will have it – the 4 million who will lose insurance. which is 28 million people, now consider that 23 Million is 5% of the US population that means that we are spending 940 Billion on 7%-8% of the population. A low estiment is $33,500 per person.

    All the numbers come from the above chart.

  • JenniferK 03/21/2010 4:55pm

    Sorry my bad I forgot to divde $33500 over the 8 years of pay out so like $4100 a year but we get to pay it for 10 years.

  • ekadic 03/23/2010 11:26am

    The bill also pushes a number of Americans into the Medicaid system, which requires states to provide matching funds (levels are different depending on state wealth). The states’ responsibilities are not covered by the CBO estimates or the budget.

    Regardless, I would suggest that anyone annoyed by costs of the bill attempts to purchase insurance in the private market. Just call an insurance company and request a quote. Without the power of numbers offered by the employer or federal systems, the purchasing or negotiating power of the individual with insurance companies or health service providers is minimal.

  • jennyrjenny 03/23/2010 7:54pm

    WHO WAS THIS BILL SUPPOSED TO HELP?
    THE DEMS TO THEM SLEEP BETTER AT NIGHT? DO THEY THINK THEY CAN SPEND YOUR MONEY “MORE WISELY”? I TRULY THINK THEY BELIEVE THEY ARE HELPING PEOPLE. THESE BIG GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, THAT MEMBERS ON BOTH SIDES OF THE ISLE CREATE, HELP DISTRIBUTE MONEY TO MORE APPROPRIATIONS (THEIR INTERESTS). NOT TO MENTION IT IS THE WORST WAY TO RUN ANY KIND OF COMPANY. WHEN THE GOVT TRIES IT TAKES TWICE AS MUCH MONEY AND ENDS UP BEING A CRAPPY PRODUCT. JUST LOOK AT THE POST OFFICE AND HOMESTEAD SECURITY. I MEAN A GUY GOT ON A PLANE WITH A BOMB, WHEN PRIOR TO THAT HIS FATHER, AN AMBASSADOR WARNED US. PRETTY INEFFICIENT. WHY CAN THEY NOT THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX AND COME UP WITH INNOVATIVE AND MONEY GROWING SOLUTIONS IF IN FACT THEY ACTUALLY WANT TO HELP THE DOWN TRODDEN. BUT THEN THEY GET NO MONEY OUT OF IT. I HOPE THEY ARE JUST STUPID, AND NOT GREEDY

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