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House spends 2 days on non-binding resolution, gives PATRIOT Act 1 hour

February 11, 2011 - by Donny Shaw

Just in case you need more evidence that the floor of the House of Representatives has devolved into little more than a political sideshow, let’s take a look at how they’re allocating their time these days. On Wednesday the Rules Committee got together for 10 minutes to decide that extending the three most controversial provisions of the PATRIOT Act would be allowed 1 hour of debate on the floor. The day before that they met for more than an hour and decided to give 9.5 hours of debate to …wait for it… a non-binding resolution directing committees to hold hearings on regulations that businesses don’t like.

That’s right. One hour for debate on allowing the government to continue demanding that libraries and businesses turn over individuals’ private records without being allowed to notify the individual, but 9.5 hours for debating on a non-binding bill requesting committees to hold hearings. One hour for debate on allowing the government to continue using “roving” wiretaps on multiple phones and devices that suspects may possibly use, but 9.5 hours for debating on a non-binding bill requesting committees to hold hearings. One hour for debate on allowing the government to spy on supposed terrorist suspects that aren’t part of a terrorist group, but 9.5 hours for debating on a non-binding bill requesting committees to hold hearings. You get the picture.

By the way, H.Res.72, the bill calling on committees to hold hearings on regulations, passed this afternoon by a vote of 391-28. That’s not the kind of roll call result you expect to see from a bill that merits 9.5 hours of debate. Obvously, regulations are an important issue and there is a strong need for honest, bipartisan debate here. But 9.5 hours on a non-binding bill calling for hearing is not an honest debate, it’s a forum for slinging talking points at the C-SPAN cameras. Let’s save the 9.5 hours for when there are actual regulatory reforms on the table.

(h/t @KagroX)

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Comments

  • ssari30 02/11/2011 2:55pm
    Bohener, What about the 99ers!! For someone who is an emotional person. You sure are not showing any for us You want to help fix and repair this country? Then extend unemployment for the 99ers, it’s that simple!
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  • ssari30 02/11/2011 3:11pm

    Okay Boehner well the 1.4 million people will be out front of the White House and the Capitol starting on Monday! Then we will be out in front of your offices and homes! It’s time to March on Washington and all over the Republicans! Boehner you want something to cry about!? No problem, I got you!

  • layofflist 02/12/2011 2:29am

    It’s rather easy for Congress to take away Constitutional rights. After what they saw in Egypt, they will likely try and find ways to take away even more of your rights. Of course with most eyes and ears plugged into some iphone app or nonsense tv program, it’s unlikely that most Americans would even care. Just don’t raise the price of texting, cable tv, or gas for the 4×4 and Americans will let Clowngress trample on their rights to the fullest extent possible.

    What happened to the new ways of the Tea Party. I guess they also decided that taking away the rights of the individual are ok now that they are in positions of power. New party, same as the old party.

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