OpenCongress Blog

Blog Feed Comments Feed More RSS Feeds

Help Us Whip #PIPA

January 13, 2012 - by Donny Shaw

Ahead of the January 24th vote on the PROTECT-IP Act (a.k.a. PIPA) we’re organizing a distributed public whip-count campaign to find out where each member of the U.S. Senate stands on the bill. This bill would establish the first ever internet censorship system in the United States, and our right to free speech depends on it being killed. It’s being rushed to a vote on the first day back from January recess even though the only debate it’s had so far was at an 8-minute mark-up session in the Judiciary Committee – where no objections were heard and no tech experts had a chance to register their protest.

1. Call Congress — Use the tool below to find your senators’ phone numbers. When calling their D.C. office, first identify yourself as a constituent, give your name and mailing address for verification, and say you have an issue to raise and that you would like a response from your Sen. Then ask to speak to the legislative aid who handles technology issues. If he or she is unavailable (as is likely), leave a message that you oppose H.R.3261, SOPA, the so-called Stop Online Piracy Act, and that you urge your Sen. to vote No.

2. Report back — Update the call log telling us how the call went and any info you got about where your senators stands on the bill. 

3. We’ll update our public whip sheet — Your work will help us (i.e. PPF), our partners in the American Censorship Day coalition, and activists across the country target actions at key senators so we can stop this bill from advancing any further. Click here to check out the whip sheet.

We’ll have more coming out on this whip campaign later today and this week, including talking points to use for your calls and a full table outlining every members’ position or lack of position on the bill. For now, we need to get this started. Please help.

Three key reasons to oppose PROTECT-IP

Violates freedom of speech — PROTECT-IP’s dragnet approach to dealing with bad actors online would shut down entire websites over a single copyright-infringing link. That means sites with tons of legitimate, constitutionally-protected speech could be blacklisted by corporations and the government if a single user posts a copyrighted link. It creates an ideal tool for governments and corporations to censor speech that they would prefer did not exist. Several top legal scholars have already declared the bill’s provisions to be in violation of the First Amendment.

Threatens job growth — As a nation we are increasingly banking on job growth to come from the technology and information sector. It’s an area where we’ve always been leaders, but POTECT-IP could change that by creating massive new uncertainty for almost all online sites. The new compliance requirements and liabilities that U.S. sites would face under this bill have already caused dozens of the largest American venture capitalist firms to warn that PROTECT-IP would slow start-up innovation.

Makes the web less secure — For more than a decade online security experts have been building a system to secure the web and prevent online identity theft known as DNSSEC. The system is just starting to be implemented, but under PROTECT-IP it would be made illegal. That’s because to work the system has to try to get around any DNS blockages it encounters, something that the PROTECT-IP Act would define as “enabling” and “facilitating” copyright infringement. Security experts have been trying to have their concerns heard before Congress, but so far they’ve been drowned out by the entertainment industry.

Please share with your networks:

 

Share on Twitter Share on FB

 

Like this post? Stay in touch by following us on Twitter, joining us on Facebook, or by Subscribing with RSS.
 

Comments

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

ruthy30z 02/09/2012 5:30pm
in reply to tammigr21 Feb 06, 2012 5:21pm

This was a very interesting and fun article to read. I have enjoyed this information so much. This was awesome. "David Lichtenstein ":http://deal-junkie.blogspot.com/2009/06/david-lichtenstein-on-cnbc.html

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

Spam Comment

LeagueDen 01/20/2012 12:18am
darkart1 01/17/2012 7:57pm

Adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776… “—That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.” 

darkart1 01/17/2012 7:56pm
in reply to iamaster Jan 15, 2012 7:17am

Health care may be important, but government does NOT need to take it over. Nor does government need to be taking anything over. Government is the most wasteful, inefficient and unethical of orginazations ever to run anything.

Spam Comment

HildaSuf 01/14/2012 4:00pm

The federal government has already taken over health care, car manufacturing, student loans, much of banking – why not try for internet. Does the media support conservatism, or Obama? – what is liberation theology – nevermind, no corruption in politics – never was – and the economy is great – turn on the TV, the economy is getting better every day.
- cnsnews-com FCC Moves to Regulate Internet—Even Though the Law Calls for Internet to be ‘Unfettered by Federal or State Regulation’ , June 18, 2010

Moderated Comment

Due to the archiving of this blog, comment posting has been disabled.