H.R.3590 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to modify the first-time homebuyers credit in the case of members of the Armed Forces and certain other Federal employees, and for other purposes. view all titles (46)

All Bill Titles

  • Popular: Health care reform bill as .
  • Official: To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to modify the first-time homebuyers credit in the case of members of the Armed Forces and certain other Federal employees, and for other purposes. as introduced.
  • Short: Service Members Home Ownership Tax Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Service Members Home Ownership Tax Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Popular: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as introduced.
  • Popular: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Legislative Vehicle) as introduced.
  • Short: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as passed senate.
  • Official: An act entitled The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. as amended by senate.
  • Short: Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 as passed senate.
  • Short: Catalyst to Better Diabetes Care Act of 2009 as passed senate.
  • Short: CLASS Act as passed senate.
  • Short: Community Living Assistance Services and Supports Act as passed senate.
  • Short: Congenital Heart Futures Act as passed senate.
  • Short: Cures Acceleration Network Act of 2009 as passed senate.
  • Short: EARLY Act as passed senate.
  • Short: Elder Justice Act of 2009 as passed senate.
  • Short: ENHANCED Act of 2009 as passed senate.
  • Short: Establishing a Network of Health-Advancing National Centers of Excellence for Depression Act of 2009 as passed senate.
  • Short: Young Women's Breast Health Education and Awareness Requires Learning Young Act of 2009 as passed senate.
  • Official: An act entitled The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. as introduced.
  • Popular: Health care reform bill.
  • Popular: Patient protection and affordable care bill.
  • Short: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as passed house.
  • Short: Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Catalyst to Better Diabetes Care Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: CLASS Act as passed house.
  • Short: Community Living Assistance Services and Supports Act as passed house.
  • Short: Congenital Heart Futures Act as passed house.
  • Short: Cures Acceleration Network Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: EARLY Act as passed house.
  • Short: Elder Justice Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: ENHANCED Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Establishing a Network of Health-Advancing National Centers of Excellence for Depression Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Young Women's Breast Health Education and Awareness Requires Learning Young Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Young Women's Breast Health Education and Awareness Requires Learning Young Act of 2009 as enacted.
  • Short: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as enacted.
  • Short: Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 as enacted.
  • Short: Catalyst to Better Diabetes Care Act of 2009 as enacted.
  • Short: CLASS Act as enacted.
  • Short: Community Living Assistance Services and Supports Act as enacted.
  • Short: Congenital Heart Futures Act as enacted.
  • Short: Cures Acceleration Network Act of 2009 as enacted.
  • Short: EARLY Act as enacted.
  • Short: Elder Justice Act of 2009 as enacted.
  • Short: ENHANCED Act of 2009 as enacted.
  • Short: Establishing a Network of Health-Advancing National Centers of Excellence for Depression Act of 2009 as enacted.

Comments Feed

Displaying 31-60 of 211 total comments.

  • Comm_reply
    LucasFoxx 03/01/2010 5:47pm

    Fortunately, none of the voting on this site reflects the electorate; it does, however, match the rhetoric here.

  • Comm_reply
    JobyOne 07/13/2010 1:21pm

    I certainly have. I love the idea of this website, but I wish it were a better sampling of the people at large. There seems to be a pretty hard bend to the right here.

    That’s why most of the time I use it just to keep track of the progress of bills, and try to pretend the comments don’t exist (except just now obviously).

  • Comm_reply
    honestgrunt 01/25/2010 3:32pm

    Back in the day they might have responded to the constituents that voted for’em, now they’re just ignoring them. and they should care about the teabaggers because in the end it might just be those who the offended that will decide whether they stay in office or get the boot.

  • Comm_reply
    geekmom 03/24/2010 12:15pm

    so typical of you. teabaggers. what an immature and lame thing to say. so pinko, i hope you like your new found socialist government that will lose in 2010? how is that. at least my term for you is a bit more truthful.

    you’re a 30% minority. every poll that i’ve seen has shown you on the low end. get over it.

  • Comm_reply
    LucasFoxx 03/24/2010 9:22pm

    Hmmmm… I’ll only say that I voted for the Democratic take back of congress, and the current President, partly because I had, and might still have, the same sentiments toward the Republican party that you are expressing. The current majority, my local reps, and the President are currently trying to solve the problems we voted them into office to solve. You’re statistic doesn’t really mean much to me in that light.

  • Comm_reply
    hanawaykp 11/11/2010 6:51am

    There are a seeming majority of people who, according to the latest surveys, do not support this bill. However, approximately a third of those who don’t support the bill do so because they wanted the bill to go further. The bottom line is that this bill more supported than not. It simple logic but it will be spinned until there is nothing logical about it.

    For Republicans the votes and their wins speak volumes. But, much like the healthcare bill I would not be quick to draw any final conclusions.

  • eohusby 12/20/2009 2:08pm

    The Democratic “health care reform” effort has become an election campaign. They just want something, anything, to pass. They don’t even care that the Senate bill will not reduce health care costs, will not reduce health insurance costs, will raise taxes on the middle class, will severely hurt small businesses, will increase the deficit, and otherwise will not achieve any of the goals that President Obama set for health care reform.

    The process is not transparent, as was promised. This is a behind closed doors process full of payoffs and kickbacks. If this thing passes, it will be a sad day for our country.

    Keep up the fight!

  • Comm_reply
    driskells 12/26/2009 12:19am

    It would be nice to consume some facts. I find many of the replies amusing. It is the individulism that has torn this country apart.

  • Comm_reply
    freetobeme500 12/26/2009 3:48am

    This is a very scary comment. I find the individual to be the heart and soul of a nation. It is when we all fall in line and march the goosestep that great misfortune will befall us. History is full of examples of nations whose people have cowered to the government controls. This government has the right to collect taxes from a citizen, it also has the right to draft said citizen into the armed forces. Beyond that I do not believe they have the right to require me (or force me!) to do anything!

  • Comm_reply
    suzieqs 12/31/2009 3:26am

    freetobeme500, I agree with your statement, however, those who let the fear-mongers of the media rule their lives is the cause of much of this polarization of the 2 major parties. In regards to your last statement we are required to have a Driver’s License in order to drive on public streets, we are required to have our vehicles registered and liscensed in order to have those vehicles on those same streets, we are required to have proof of insurance to get those vehicles registered and licensed. So why aren’t you crying about those things. If our market would have worked the way it should have in the first place, our government wouldn’t have had to step in in the first place.

  • Spam Comment

  • Comm_reply
    LucasFoxx 12/31/2009 11:56am

    You mean the Transportation Safety Administration that keeps the average nut-job from boarding planes with guns and grenades and prevents the airlines themselves from cost cutting below saftey limits. In a back-handed way, you are making the case for government regulated health care reform.

  • Comm_reply
    honestgrunt 01/25/2010 3:27pm
    Link Reply
    + -2

    Yeah but if you look closely at TSA you’ll see how fucked up it really is and that it really doesnt work. (IE, the Xmas Bomber for one example). If their hands were untied, TSA would be great, till then their just a pain in the ass.

  • Comm_reply
    Torry 03/29/2010 9:43am

    The TSA had nothing to do with the Xmas bomber. He came in from a foreign country, and through their security, not ours.

  • Comm_reply

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  • Comm_reply
    suzieqs 01/10/2010 2:45am

    Well choosing to “step in” as you state wouldn’t have had to happen in the first place if the insurance agencies would have not limited eligibility for insurance based on pre-existing conditions, also allowing pharmaceutical companies to charge exorbinant fees for their drugs, how can you justify a person being charged “$937.00 for a prescription drug” that doesn’t offer a generic version, because the FDA allows the pharmaceutical co. to hold the patent on it. (Yes I realize this is a government agency.)

  • Comm_reply
    suzieqs 01/10/2010 2:45am

    (continued)
    Also, justify the varying cost for lab tests for me. For example, I am charged $107.00 to have a Dilantin level drawn through a local hospital, but if I were to have one of the non-local labs do that same test I’d only be charged $30.00. Why should it cost more through the hospital lab than another? I know this health care reform doesn’t address every issue that comes to mind but it does address many. If my mother and I didn’t live together we’d be out on the streets homeless, because we couldn’t afford to rent an apartment, pay for utilities, or our medications otherwise. It’s because the very wealthy only care for themselves and to “hell” with the rest of the population.

  • Comm_reply
    SanityCheck 01/11/2010 11:12am
    Link Reply
    + -2

    Suzieqs, there are clearly problems with health care and prescription costs. But nothing in the bills being shoved through congress will correct the very real problems. This is because no one is doing a “root cause” analysis of why medical care has grown so expensive. As a result, the proposals are emotion-based—like your silly comment about the “very wealthy.”

    We’ve all experienced some thoroughly irrational charges, but how much investigation have you done to get to the bottom of them? Some are related to the way health insurances pay out to providers, some are caused by the fact that doctors themselves rarely know what the cost of any particular procedure is, and some are cause by other common-sense factors such as having insurance stand between you and the provider. None of these real causes are being addressed by congress. What you’ll get with their solution is more cost for less service.

  • Comm_reply
    suzieqs 01/11/2010 3:26pm

    Well I have done some research and I agree that this monster of a bill is not going to get at the “root” of the problem. Here goes.
    1.DME Charging exorbitant fees for equipment. Justify a company charging a hospital 10,000 a day for a specialized bed; I know this as a fact because a hospital I worked in had to rent one
    2.Variances between hospital lab fees and diagnostic lab fees (ex. Oaklawn Hospital charges $107 for a Dilantin level Quest charges $30)
    3 Too many physicians are specialized and only look at one specific area, rather than looking at your overall condition. (They all studied general medicine first before they specialized)
    4.Place some limitations (tort reform) on malpractice lawsuits. Some are valid while others are just usually junk lawsuits.
    5.If people are uninsured offer either Medicare or Medicaid on a sliding scale. Or if they are self pay make their costs affordable, work out a realistic payment plan for them.
    Continued—

  • Comm_reply
    suzieqs 01/11/2010 3:30pm

    6. Stop excessive hospital charges, such as the costs for adhesive tape, bandages, etc. I’m sorry but charging a patient 15.00 for a roll of tape, or 30.00 for a box of gloves while hospitalized is a bit ridiculous.
    7. Get more clinics in rural areas, not just in the big cities and the suburbs. If we can get control on the actual cost of health care itself, then we wouldn’t need to worry about the uninsured needingn insurance.
    There’s many more things that need changing besides the cost of prescription drugs but I can’t think of them right now..

  • Comm_reply
    GDWang 01/19/2010 8:11pm

    Government regulation is the only way to ensure individual rights and privileges are safe when in conflict with the stated goals of corporations, which is to make money and not provide healthcare. Insurance companies are only there to collect premiums and pay as little as possible for services. Hospitals and clinics (excluding private hospitals) do not turn away critically sick patients but insurance companies will refuse to cover sick patients and patients with pre-existing conditions. Increases in healthcare costs through uncompensated care are not bore by the insurance companies but rather the average tax payer and the health delivery system (hospitals and clinics). Without government intervention to provide basic health care to the American people, who will? Should we establish a survival of the richest society?

  • Comm_reply
    honestgrunt 01/25/2010 3:23pm
    Link Reply
    + -4

    have you ever heard of the ‘Free Market’. the part that makes it work is the FREE part. Government interference is what screws it up. i aint saying there shouldnt be rule and regs, but when a gov. starts imposing to many rules and regs on a so called free market it is no longer a free market. It becomes regulated. Bill Gates is the perfect example of the “American Dream”. He started the company in a garage. Just because he made a product that every one wanted, used and revolutionized the industry dosent mean that he should be stopped. Would you want that happen to you: would you want your hard work to be taken a way from you just because you made a superior product?

  • Comm_reply
    Americafirst 03/17/2010 4:37pm

    hones
    it is a MONOPOLY NOW!
    Reform will make it a free market! Get it!

  • Comm_reply
    Analyst1 08/19/2010 1:51am

    “have you ever heard of the ‘Free Market’. the part that makes it work is the FREE part.”
    A splendid joke chap! Well met!
    Oh wait, your serious.
    The problem with your statement is that in the U.S. there isn’t and hasn’t been a “Free Market” for some time. In a Free Market there are no restrictions on what can be done in the private sector aside basic property laws. Evidently this isn’t what you want though, considering that you go on to say:
    “i aint saying there shouldnt be rule and regs …”
    What you have described here isn’t a free market at all, it’s what is called a mixed market, and it just so happens to be the type of market the U.S. has had for decades. A mixed market is simply a market that allows for private control of assets with government regulation.
    You then making assertions that no one seems to be suggesting. No one has said private industry should in anyway be overturned. No one has stated that people shouldn’t be allowed to try and sell superior products to the public.

  • Comm_reply
    saknama 03/11/2010 11:43am

    Which is unconstitutional.
    The gov stepping in is exactly what they’re not supposed to do.

    Those things are not mandated unless you choose to use them. I know plenty of people who don’t own a vehicle and therefore don’t need any of the items that you mentioned.

    It’s not the gov’s role to tell us what we can do and what we can’t do. It’s their role to ensure that our rights are not taken from us. Instead, the gov is systematically editing our rights out of the constitution.

  • Comm_reply
    opuspenquin 03/12/2010 2:09pm
    Link Reply
    + -1

    Hear Hear Saknama.
    Government needs to butt out of our lives. One question I always ask: Is this giving me more liberty and freedom or is it taking away liberty and freedom?

  • Comm_reply
    Analyst1 08/19/2010 2:03am

    “It’s not the gov’s role to tell us what we can do and what we can’t do. It’s their role to ensure that our rights are not taken from us.”

    So the government is obligated to ensure our rights are not taken from us, however in order to do that the government must at some point impede on the rights of those that would take those rights away from us.

    In order to have some rights, other rights must be taken away. If someone has a car, in a state of anarchy they would be able to drive at 100+ mph without any issue from an overarching authority. However, our nation values safety, so in the U.S. a car must operate within accepted speed limits so as to protect the safety of the group. The right to go 100mph is taken in exchange for the right to pass through our road systems with relative safety. In that sense, the government is very much telling us what we can and can’t do, because such a deed is necessary to preserve our rights.

  • Comm_reply
    nwipling 11/29/2010 12:00am

    @Analyst1
    The difference is that public roads are a public good, financed by the public. Health insurance companies, are not.

    Government jurisdiction should be religated to institutions and assets that are public goods.

  • Comm_reply
    Corivee 03/22/2010 12:39pm

    Freetobeme500:
    I assume you are referring to the forced insurance. Are you serious? Do you think this is the first time the gov. is forcing something on you? Case in point. Today I awoke to the sound of chainsaws. I assumed it was a neighbor doing yard work. No. My city cut down three trees in my yard and left the debries. I have no idea why. The gov can also force a citizen to sell his/her land for gov. purposes, forces citizens to have car insurance to legally drive, forces parents to send children to school, hell, they can tear down the fence in your yard if you build it too high. The list goes on and on. I babysit children for extra income and if I have more than two children in my home at a time I need a business license and a child care provider license or I risk a fine. Come on. There are a lot of things we as Americans are forced to do. The government is everywhere. This Healthcare Bill is just another piece.

  • Comm_reply
    nwipling 11/29/2010 12:04am

    And this intrusive, over-extending form of government is what those logically consistent ‘tea baggers’ are protesting against.


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