H.R.3261 - Stop Online Piracy Act

To promote prosperity, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation by combating the theft of U.S. property, and for other purposes. view all titles (7)

All Bill Titles

  • Popular: SOPA as .
  • Popular: Stop Online Piracy Act as introduced.
  • Short: Stop Online Piracy Act as introduced.
  • Official: To promote prosperity, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation by combating the theft of U.S. property, and for other purposes. as introduced.
  • Popular: Enforcing and Protecting American Rights Against Sites Intent on Theft and Exploitation Act as introduced.
  • Popular: E-PARASITE Act as introduced.
  • Popular: SOPA.

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Displaying 121-150 of 495 total comments.

cadaverousmob 12/22/2011 5:11pm
in reply to CurtisNeeley Dec 22, 2011 1:39am

Your quote: “I propose…”
Who the hell cares what you propose? haha No one cares! All you’ve been doing is spouting opinion after opinion and no one cares! haha Also, your OPINION about using a foreign DNS is your opinion and no one cares! You don’t seem to get that. Millions of people use VPNs and proxies like Tor, MegaProxy, and Anomos and they find them just fine so the only ridiculous solution is yours!!!!

Again no one gives a d@mn what you propose or what you think. We only care about stopping this heinous and corrupt bill. As of right now, I have 1638 people who agree with me while you only have 14. So go cry a river somewhere else.

retched 12/23/2011 2:08am
in reply to WasMiddleClass Dec 22, 2011 9:27pm

Okay… so I am seriously contemplating putting my name on the ballot for the House in 2012… just to stop this.

asasasas 11/18/2011 8:33am
in reply to CurtisNeeley Nov 08, 2011 10:40am

“Thinker-politicians like Jefferson, Adams and Madison were just as
familiar as we are with the metaphor that likens created work to
physical property, especially to a landed estate. But they thought of
that landed estate in a new way – as the basis of a republic. An
American’s land was his own – he owed allegiance to no sovereign – but
his ownership imposed on him an almost sacred moral requirement to
contribute to the public good. According to Hyde, this ethic of “civic
republicanism” was the ideological engine that drove the founders’
conception of intellectual property, and to his mind, it undercuts the
ethic of “commercial republicanism” that dominates our current
conception of it. Our right to property is not absolute; our possessions
are held in trust, as it were. Seen through the prism of early civic
Republicanism, Hyde asks, what might the creative self look like? Do we
imagine that self as “solitary and self-made”? Or as “collective, common
and interdependent”?

walker7 12/24/2011 9:27pm
in reply to walker7 Dec 24, 2011 9:16pm

In addition, on this site, you can boycott GoDaddy:

http://godaddyboycott.org/

You don’t have to transfer any domains, but you can do so if you so choose. Remember that you want GoDaddy to stop support of BOTH the SOPA and PIPA bills.

walker7 01/05/2012 9:50am

Another article, saying that Congress resists SOPA:

http://www.salon.com/2012/01/03/left_and_right_congress_resists_the_stop_online_piracy_act/

WeAreButler 12/27/2011 10:43pm

SOPA in itself is NOT a violation of any amendments or an invasion of privacy — get that through your heads! Copyright infringement is terrible and should be removed. The premise of this bill is perfect, however I disagree with the means.

SOPA is great in it’s premise, however it gives OTHER PEOPLE the power to limit our civil rights. I firmly believe this will culminate into destruction — as if they have the power they will certainly abuse it.

SOPA is not an infringement against anything, and these internet kids need to stop bringing up the First Amendment.

I oppose it SOPA, and hope you do too, but don’t argue with these terrible arguments.
Logically it should pass as the only issue is our ideology and lack of trust in the government, which I believe is correct, but the government will pass it, as they want power and will assure you they will not abuse their power.

There is nothing intrinsically wrong with SOPA.
Again I am against it, as I distrust the government.

walker7 01/10/2012 11:12pm

Here’s a petition you might want to sign:

http://www.change.org/petitions/tell-electronic-arts-to-oppose-internet-censorship

walker7 01/30/2012 6:01pm

Here’s a petition for Google to quit the Chamber of Commerce:

http://act.demandprogress.org/sign/google_quit/?akid=1187.585444.XmencS&rd=1&t=2

IvyLilithe 11/29/2011 1:50pm
in reply to CurtisNeeley Nov 24, 2011 11:03pm

SHUT UP ABOUT YOUR DAMN PORN, NOBODY CARES!

CurtisNeeley 11/04/2011 11:40pm
in reply to molonlabe Nov 04, 2011 7:39pm

The “natural rights” rational v “utilitarian rights” rational are mutually exclusive rationals for IP that is very obvious but apparently was over N. Stephan Kinsella’s logical abilities? This may have came from the incorrect claim on page fifteen.

“Only A has the right to copy the book (hence, ‘copyright’”

N. Stephan Kinsella therein reveals a fundamental logical error. There are no “natural rights” involved whatsoever in United States copy[]right or IP laws. The rite of printing a book was initially called a “right” when Queen Anne allowed one printer to control all printing unless another party was given permission to print. The first copyrite statute in about 1710 or Statute of Anne. I agree with the claim that a personal right can not last longer than a person lives.
Appellant Brief PDF

Artrimil 01/20/2012 3:09pm

I hope that Congress realizes that the MPAA and all of their affiliates got started because they committed copyright infringement. Video recording was patented by Edison then after that they basically said “Screw you we want to make movies without having to pay you for your world-changing technology!”. If they are going to support something like SOPA and PIPA, they should at least get their facts straight and not be complete hypocrites. Oh wait, everyone in Congress, the White House staff, the Supreme Court, and the Federal Reserve(which isn’t even affiliated with the government, they are a privately owned sector that the government loves because they can get money from them for free) are all hypocrites already. Don’t worry about the election, it won’t change anything. If you want to do something about the corruption that’s trying to control us, then take action. Don’t vote, protest(peacefully). Don’t take their crap any more.

PS: You should have expected us.

walker7 01/19/2012 8:11pm

IMPORTANT: Here is a petition that you should definitely sign.

http://act.demandprogress.org/letter/megaupload_seizure/?akid=1155.585444.PHZzk0&rd=1&t=2

In case you don’t know already, Megaupload was seized shortly after yesterday’s PIPA protest. This is just a preview of what could happen if PIPA or SOPA were to pass. Please do not let this happen again. I hope that a lot of people sign this petition.

OperationBoobiesForFreedom 01/20/2012 3:52pm

My name is Jennifer, and I think that SOPA is a terrible idea, puts the very fabric of our free speech in jeopardy, and we should do everything we feel we can to fight it.

Thanks in advance for your help, I hope that if enough of us stick together and make enough noise, we can beat this thing!

Jennifer Sulkin

OPERATION BOOBIES FOR FREEDOM

==========
YouTube video
http://youtu.be/quTTiry6IJE

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Operation-Boobies-For-Freedom-BFF/349045891774627
==========

http://blacklist.eff.org/
THESE cats have their crap together. Go here, they’ll make it really easy for you to be loud at the people that make decisions.

==========

all questions and comments can be directed to:

operationboobiesforfreedom@gmail.com

Please at least repost it, we could really use your help! Thanks, see ya there!

ToBeContinued 01/16/2012 2:37pm

Thank You president Barack Obama for doing the right thing and opposing this bill!

Geowil 01/11/2012 2:41am
in reply to CurtisNeeley Nov 18, 2011 7:26am

You know that proposed bill will never work. It talks about censoring what you do on your own devices, that you bought and paid for. It is an invasion of privacy and there would still be ways to get around it.

Let this be a lesson to you:

You can not censor the Internet entirely; there will always be new technologies designed to defeat any censorship system and there will always be hacker groups ready to destroy such systems once put into place.

Porn will also never go away. What a person does on their computer is not anyone else’s business if they are not breaking the law. Free porn is not unlawful, so the whole argument is invalid.

You think OWS is bad, you ain’t seen nothing yet if SOPA and PIPA go into law. Anonymous and other hacker collectives will be over everyone that supported each like flies on the arse of a dead horse.

cadaverousmob 01/10/2012 7:25pm

Sony and Nintendo drop SOPA support: http://www.slashgear.com/sony-and-nintendo-drop-sopa-support-amid-anonymous-threats-03205579/

WasMiddleClass 01/20/2012 9:18pm
in reply to WasMiddleClass Jan 20, 2012 9:18pm

The Telecommunications Act of 1996 has also been the subject of several court challenges. Title V of the Telecommunications Act, the Communications Decency Act of 1996, sought to protect minors from exposure to indecent materials transmitted over the Internet. The Supreme Court, in a highly debated case, struck down most of those provisions on First Amendment grounds in Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union, 521 U.S. 844, 117 S. Ct. 2329, 138 L. Ed. 2d 874 (1997). The Telecommunications Act also included so-called “signal bleed” provisions, requiring cable operators either to scramble channels containing sexually explicit materials or to limit programming on these channels to certain hours. The Supreme Court likewise struck down these requirements as impermissible content-based restrictions in violation of the First Amendment in United States v. Playboy Entertainment Group, Inc., 529 U.S. 803, 120 S. Ct. 1878, 146 L. Ed. 2d 865 (2000).

mgdesmond13 01/16/2012 1:13pm

this bill itself is an act of treason. this is why we have due process.

CaptainStar 01/03/2012 2:15pm

This bill is stupid!

silverado99 01/14/2012 1:09pm
in reply to DanielALockhart Dec 29, 2011 12:45am

“but what is shouldn’t mean is that the writer has a team of armed goons ready to stick guns in people’s faces demanding payment for singing their songs at karaoke”

Wow….did you even READ any of the bill? This hyperbolic nonsense is why things get out of hand. This bill is saying that if you run, operate, or use a site that is solely dedicated to theft of intellectual property, you are more than likely going to go to jail or be fined pretty heavily.

walker7 01/05/2012 9:34pm

Our best chance to stop SOPA and/or PIPA can be done if you have an in-person meeting with your senators. Make sure that we get at least 41 senators to agree to block the vote. The address is:

http://act.fightforthefuture.org/page/m/2e1f206a/1d1430a9/71cb3912/f863e52/2427177326/VEsH/p/eyJKU1ZUVkVGVVJWOUJRa0pTSlNVPSI6Ik5DIn0=/

Please make sure you tell them that SOPA (1) will cripple the Internet; (2) it’s the worst piece of IP legislation, an incentive for it not to pass; (3) it’s deemed unconstitutional; (4) if these bills are defeated, the general public will be relieved; (5) it would be a step backward in the Internet revolution if it was passed; (6) it isn’t certain whether the President will veto this bill; (7) it would destroy innovation and small businesses; and (8) Darrell Issa and Ron Wyden already have the alternative to both bills, which is OPEN.

If we succeed, we will no longer have to worry about SOPA and/or PIPA.

walker7 01/14/2012 4:25pm

More Big News: White House Will Not Support SOPA & PIPA:

https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petition-tool/response/combating-online-piracy-while-protecting-open-and-innovative-internet

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/14/white-house-sopa-pipa_n_1206347.html

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120114/09513217409/white-house-comes-out-against-approach-sopapipa-response-to-online-petition.shtml?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

BIG ONE!: SOPA shelved until ‘consensus’ is found:

http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/204167-sopa-shelved-until-consensus-is-found

cadaverousmob 01/16/2012 3:00pm

House Kills SOPA: http://www.examiner.com/computers-in-denver/house-kills-sopa

Now that SOPA is officially dead—as well as CurtisNeeley—next is its sister, PIPA. Kill PIPA: http://www.opencongress.org/articles/view/2458-PIPA-first-on-Senate-agenda-on-Jan-24th-2012 !

walker7 01/24/2012 5:24pm

Here’s another petition to sign, which will give back the MPAA’s dirty money:

http://act2.freepress.net/sign/sopapipa_mpaa/?akid=3226.9932533.FeHiRA&rd=1&t=3

And here is a petition to stop ACTA (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement):

https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petitions#!/petition/end-acta-and-protect-our-right-privacy-internet/MwfSVNBK

cabankelvin 12/06/2011 1:13pm

This bill or proposed law is wrong.The internet will not be an entertaining vehicle if this bill is approved.Many companies try to project something and influence people in a way.This while they see their same material used by Internet users for entertaining purposes on the world wide web but with a different kind of educational focus or role.The owners of those companies forget that those people are citizens who in some cases have their own internet pages that they economically maintain and that those people are not looking to have any lucrative interest because of that property.If this is approved the freedom of speech by regular citizens will be affected as people will not be able to use photos,videos or any material owned by the big interest companies because of copyrights.Citizens will have to pay jail for that.It seems that there is a Government concern on how the internet continues to influence the people by using the same freedom of speech used in other communications vehicles.

WasMiddleClass 01/08/2012 8:35pm
in reply to CurtisNeeley Jan 08, 2012 3:53pm

The Telecommunications Act of 1996 has also been the subject of several court challenges. Title V of the Telecommunications Act, the Communications Decency Act of 1996, sought to protect minors from exposure to indecent materials transmitted over the Internet. The Supreme Court, in a highly debated case, struck down most of those provisions on First Amendment grounds in Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union, 521 U.S. 844, 117 S. Ct. 2329, 138 L. Ed. 2d 874 (1997). The Telecommunications Act also included so-called “signal bleed” provisions, requiring cable operators either to scramble channels containing sexually explicit materials or to limit programming on these channels to certain hours. The Supreme Court likewise struck down these requirements as impermissible content-based restrictions in violation of the First Amendment in United States v. Playboy Entertainment Group, Inc., 529 U.S. 803, 120 S. Ct. 1878, 146 L. Ed. 2d 865 (2000).

CurtisNeeley 01/08/2012 3:53pm
in reply to WasMiddleClass Jan 08, 2012 1:50pm

The Copy[rite] Act has been unconstitutional since the day Mr. Washington signed it in 1790.

The United States was closer to democracy in 1790 but is not the least democratic today as can be seen graphically at the next link. Re-use this idea or graphic freely. This idea is released to the public domain.
Compare democracy from 1790 to 2010.html

The United States has never been terribly democratic and has always been ruled by the privileged. The graphic from 1790 is not been done yet.

There is no right to internet wire communications; -Just as there is no right to radio or television. The constitution alleged to recognize the rights of authors and creator for limited times.

The FCC has in its mission or duty " to make available, so far as possible, to all the people of the United States, without discrimination […], a rapid, efficient, Nation-wide, and world-wide wire and radio communication service".

WasMiddleClass 01/08/2012 8:34pm
in reply to CurtisNeeley Jan 08, 2012 3:53pm

I read this that someone posted way back there today: “Although I don’t support the bill I’d like to point out that having the internet isn’t a right. It’s a convenience.”

Now you claim : “There is no right to internet wire communications”

That reminds me of government claims that driving is not a right, but a privilege. The difference is though that the government owns most roads….

But your complaint Mr. Neeley seems to be about someone steeling your nude pictures, and as you claim, making them available to children.

Is your site password protected, or is what you post available for ALL to view by YOUR OWN choice?

stephenmac7 01/08/2012 1:40pm
in reply to ashlelyliz Nov 16, 2011 1:34pm

Although I don’t support the bill I’d like to point out that having the internet isn’t a right. It’s a convenience. Actually Pirating is also a convenience, if internet is a “Right” then being able to pirate something is a right

ToBeContinued 12/28/2011 2:44pm

Dear Congress

You hate to know all the details of this bill BEFORE voting for it.
Here are some facts for you…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJIuYgIvKsc


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