H.R.4173 - Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act

To provide for financial regulatory reform, to protect consumers and investors, to enhance Federal understanding of insurance issues, to regulate the over-the-counter derivatives markets, and for other purposes. view all titles (55)

All Bill Titles

  • Official: To provide for financial regulatory reform, to protect consumers and investors, to enhance Federal understanding of insurance issues, to regulate the over-the-counter derivatives markets, and for other purposes. as introduced.
  • Short: Accountability and Transparency in Rating Agencies Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Consumer Financial Protection Agency Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Corporate and Financial Institution Compensation Fairness Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Credit Risk Retention Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Dissolution Authority for Large, Interconnected Financial Companies Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Federal Insurance Office Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Financial Stability Improvement Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Investor Protection Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Over-the-Counter Derivatives Markets Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Private Fund Investment Advisers Registration Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2009 as introduced.
  • Short: Derivative Markets Transparency and Accountability Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Mortgage Reform and Anti-Predatory Lending Act as passed house.
  • Short: Nonadmitted and Reinsurance Reform Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Official: A bill to promote the financial stability of the United States by improving accountability and transparency in the financial system, to end "too big to fail", to protect the American taxpayer by ending bailouts, to protect consumers from abusive financial services practices, and for other purposes. as amended by senate.
  • Short: Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Accountability and Transparency in Rating Agencies Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Consumer Financial Protection Agency Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Corporate and Financial Institution Compensation Fairness Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Credit Risk Retention Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Dissolution Authority for Large, Interconnected Financial Companies Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Expand and Preserve Home Ownership Through Counseling Act as passed house.
  • Short: Federal Insurance Office Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Financial Stability Improvement Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Investor Protection Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Private Fund Investment Advisers Registration Act of 2009 as passed house.
  • Short: Restoring American Financial Stability Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Bank and Savings Association Holding Company and Depository Institution Regulatory Improvements Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Enhancing Financial Institution Safety and Soundness Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Financial Stability Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Improving Access to Mainstream Financial Institutions Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Nonadmitted and Reinsurance Reform Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Office of National Insurance Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Pay It Back Act as passed senate.
  • Short: Payment, Clearing, and Settlement Supervision Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Private Fund Investment Advisers Registration Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Short: Wall Street Transparency and Accountability Act of 2010 as passed senate.
  • Popular: Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act as introduced.
  • Short: Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act as enacted.
  • Short: Bank and Savings Association Holding Company and Depository Institution Regulatory Improvements Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Enhancing Financial Institution Safety and Soundness Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Expand and Preserve Home Ownership Through Counseling Act as enacted.
  • Short: Federal Insurance Office Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Financial Stability Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Improving Access to Mainstream Financial Institutions Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Investor Protection and Securities Reform Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Mortgage Reform and Anti-Predatory Lending Act as enacted.
  • Short: Nonadmitted and Reinsurance Reform Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Pay It Back Act as enacted.
  • Short: Payment, Clearing, and Settlement Supervision Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Private Fund Investment Advisers Registration Act of 2010 as enacted.
  • Short: Wall Street Transparency and Accountability Act of 2010 as enacted.

Comments Feed

Displaying 1-30 of 83 total comments.

  • NoGoodOnesLeft 12/08/2009 1:31pm

    It’s about time.

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    NoGoodOnesLeft 12/08/2009 1:31pm

    Or rather, it’s way past time for this!

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    NoGoodOnesLeft 12/14/2009 6:28am

    Looks to me like they do what they want with our money anyway – like giving 800 billion to the banks so they can pay themselves huge salaries and bonues while they already charge outrageous fees and surcharges. Too bad it isn’t “open season” on greedy people. Also looks to me like maybe you are the “sheeple.”

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    AuroraRancher 12/16/2009 2:04am

    The Definition of Insanity – Doing the same thing over & over & expecting diferent results! This is nothing more than the way it as always been stated a different way!

  • dfharing 12/08/2009 4:09pm

    Oh please let this pass….the entire state of Florida is upside down and people are just walking away. Entire neighborhoods are devastated.

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    NoGoodOnesLeft 12/10/2009 2:51am
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    + 18

    I don’t understand how those companies were allowed to become “too big to fail” in the first place. They shouldn’t necessarily be broken up, but if they fail then they fail – taxpayers shouldn’t pay for them to stay in business. Let the employees give up their million dollar bonuses or take pay cuts like other businesses have had to do.

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    zen_maker 06/26/2010 11:54am

    If China switches to euro currency, we are all doomed!

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    toray99 04/22/2010 6:11pm

    Repealing Glass Steagall act in the clinton days was the problem.
    What about fannie and freddie…? How much did barney and boyfriend herb moses make on the deal..?? Let’s not forget old cris dodd…

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    applemanmatt 09/27/2010 12:16pm

    And Joe Biden voted for it!

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    zen_maker 06/26/2010 11:53am
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    + -1

    They failed and laid of workers anyway, just let them fail!

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    Chris51 06/27/2010 10:19pm

    Congress rushed through a $700 billion bailout of Wall Street in 2008.
    The Wall Street Journal reported last week that American corporations have increased their cash reserves to $1.84 TRILLION, the highest figure in history. In other words, big business and the banks, after an unprecedented bailout by the public treasury, are hoarding the funds that could put millions back to work. The cash reserves of major corporations have jumped 26 percent in one year, the largest percentage increase in nearly 60 years. The cash reserves of working people, and particularly the unemployed, have not been so fortunate…
    BIG COMPANIES CAN CHOOSE NOT TO HIRE THE UNEMPLOYED BASED ON THEIR CREDIT REPORT
    change.org

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    Peterwang998 07/13/2010 2:19am

    They can’t fail, the Credit Default Swaps market was valued at 60 trillion dollars at the end of 2007. Without the adequate protections against counter-party defaults on CDSs, a failure of one massive institution coupled with the failure to close in defaults on the sub-prime mortgage area would of started a cascade of banks defaulting on CDS, and unable to recoup any loses from the sub-prime defaults originally hedged by the CDS.

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    fuzzymath007 07/19/2010 6:02pm
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    + -1

    Someone that understands how bad thing where back in late 2008. This bill takes some aim at the swaps markets and for that I support the move.

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    Lindasb11 12/12/2009 2:36am

    You’re absolutely correct this is a horrible bill and congress has transferred it’s powers over to the executive branch. Once again violating the constitution. Congress doesn’t have the power per the constitution to transfer power to other branches of the government give or take. This bill allows the executive branch dictorial powers!

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    brking 12/20/2009 4:58am
    no were in Constitution does it explictly say they can’t hand over their power to another branch of congress. read article one, sections 8 and 9 carefully.
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    TBSchemer 02/28/2010 12:19am

    The Executive Branch is not “another branch of congress.” It’s another branch of government, entirely separate from Congress. And it’s separate with good reason. Checks and balances were deliberately put in place in the Constitution to avoid concentration of power in any one branch.

    No where in the Constitution does it explicitly say the President can’t rip it up and start ruling by decree, but you know, some things are just implied.

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    zen_maker 06/26/2010 11:57am
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    + -2

    The constitution has been violated so many times in the past 15 years that it doesn’t even make sense to talk about constitution anymore, its has become just a piece of paper in the museum

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    zen_maker 06/26/2010 11:56am
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    + -3

    The constitution has been violated so many times in the past 15 years that it doesn’t even make sense to talk about constitution anymore, its has a become just a piece of paper in the museum.

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    rodKnee87 12/13/2009 12:52pm

    What we need is more regulation, not less. What we need is a reimposition of the Glass-Steagal Act which was passed after the depression to prevent the kind of abuse that is going on today. The so-called free market is not really free at all. It has resulted in the loss of trillions of dollars for ordinary Americans. The financial games that are being played are ridiculous and are a waste of our national resources. Far too much of the economy has been commoditized into non-productive and useless gambling. If these bankers want to gamble, they should go to Vegas. Too many commodities are traded on the spot market. Remember the disaster of trading electricity in CA? Are you aware that Enron, before the fall, was actually planning on trading “weather futures”??? It has become ludicrous and totally wasteful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It is time that America and its businessmen, bankers, financiers, etc. started making productive investments in industry, clean energy, etc.

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    thejeffersondemocrat 12/18/2009 5:48am

    THe current mess was created by federal regulations forcing banks to provide loans to people who could never afford them. Fannie + Freddie? quasi-Government entities.

    The government is already subsidizing “clean energy,” which it has no constitutional authority to do. The only authority in this realm is to issue patents to protect inventors.

    The Auto, the plane, the lightbulb. How many of the inventions we take for granted today (besides those which were originally military applications) were the result of government mandates?

    The government has no Constitutional authority to force people to “start making productive investments.”

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    brking 12/20/2009 5:13am

    here are a few parts of the constitution that might justify a subsidizing of “clean energy”

    “To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;” anything sold can be regulated a regulation might include some kind of subsist

    “provide for the… general Welfare of the United States” vagueness of what is meant by “welfare” might be used to justified it.

    “To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.” this means congress can in fact make any laws they want so long as it can called proper and necessary.

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    rodKnee87 12/20/2009 9:45pm

    The current mess was not created by regulations, but was created by the LACK of regulation. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac did not create the mess, greedy bankers and speculators at places like Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Wachovia, etc. did. Derivatives based on mortgages including credit default swaps and all kinds of other speculative instuments that were created to find greater and greater yields were the culprit.

    No one said anything about forcing people to make productive investments, but if speculation and gambling with other people’s money were illegal, there would be more productive investments made by default.

    By the way, many of the inventions that are widely used today came as a result of government research and government supported programs, i.e. through the Institute for National Health, university research funded by the government, NASA, the military, etc.


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