H.R.5351 - American Self-Defense Protection Act of 2010

To safeguard the sovereignty and right to self-defense of the United States and its allies, to prohibit United States participation in the International Criminal Court, and for other purposes. view all titles (2)

All Bill Titles

  • Official: To safeguard the sovereignty and right to self-defense of the United States and its allies, to prohibit United States participation in the International Criminal Court, and for other purposes. as introduced.
  • Short: American Self-Defense Protection Act of 2010 as introduced.

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Introduced
 
House
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Senate
Passes
 
President
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05/20/10
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Official Summary

American Self-Defense Protection Act of 2010 - Expresses the sense of Congress that: (1) the United States should not ratify, nor should the President submit for ratification, the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC); (2) the President and the Secretary of State should not

Official Summary

American Self-Defense Protection Act of 2010 - Expresses the sense of Congress that:
(1) the United States should not ratify, nor should the President submit for ratification, the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC);
(2) the President and the Secretary of State should not undertake actions that could legitimize the ICC;
(3) the President and the Secretary should lead a diplomatic effort to encourage additional countries to enter into agreements with the United States preventing the ICC from proceeding against U.S. personnel present in such countries;
(4) the President and the Secretary should lead a diplomatic effort to defend the right to self-defense of the United States and other democracies, including Israel, against efforts such as the Goldstone Report that seek to deny democracies that very right via entities like the ICC; and
(5) the President and the Secretary should explore alternative forums to combat impunity for war crimes and other atrocities while respecting the sovereignty and right to self-defense of democracies. Prohibits funds made available to any U.S. government, state, or local department, agency, or entity, including any court, from being used for U.S. participation in the ICC or its attendant activities, including any review conference or meeting of the Assembly of States Parties.

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