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CISPA is Back; All Your Data Are Belong to Us

February 14, 2013 - by Donny Shaw

Barely a year after the defeat of SOPA, Congress is back to testing the waters for legislation that many internet users believe to be in violation of their fundamental rights to privacy and free expression. CISPA, a bill that would make it easier for corporations and the government to share internet users' personal data, was officially re-introduced  in the House on Wednesday. It’s already being rushed forward in the legislative process. The House Intelligence Committee is holding a full hearing on the bill today at 10 am. They will hear from four witnesses -- all from the business sector and all supporters of CISPA. No experts with concerns about privacy issues were invited to address the committee.

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One year ago today, thousands of websites and millions of internet users took action to stop major internet censorship bills in Congress, SOPA and PIPA. The protests changed the way many people think about politics by proving that bringing together an educated public to take action, online, can defaet the corrupt agendas of the most powerful interest groups and members of Congress. To celebrate this enormous, ground-shaking victory, we (PPF) are joining a bunch of the other groups that were involved in the SOPA fight in declaring today, January 18th, a new holiday -- “Internet Freedom Day.”

 

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With cybersecurity legislation stalled in Congress, the Obama Administration is moving forward with an executive order to bypass Congress and give force of law to some of the stalled bill’s provisions. According to Jason Miller at Federal News Radio, one of the few reporters who has seen a copy of the executive order, the Administration’s proposal closely mirrors the Lieberman-Collins “Cybersecurity Act of 2012, including sections designed to encourage information sharing between web companies and the government, closely related to the provisions of the House-passed CISPA bill.

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While the latest version of the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 is better on privacy than CISPA, its House counterpart, it still gives corporations and the federal government broad new powers to monitor internet users, block access to websites and services, and share personal user information without due process. Unless these provisions are removed, the Participatory Politics Foundation (makers of OpenCongress) stand with EFF, Fight for the Future, Free Press and other tech-rights groups in opposing the bill.

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The Senate voted 84-11 on Thursday to begin debate of the latest version of the Lieberman-Collins cybersecurity legislation. The version of the bill they’ll be debating, S.3414, addresses many of the privacy concerns in the original, but it still poses some problems for civil liberties. Here are a few things to watch as the debate progresses.

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"Early June" is over and the Senate never did vote on cybersecurity legislation as they were expected to. But that doesn't mean their bill, and the internet privacy obliterating provisions in it, are dead. According to new reports, the supporters of the leading cybersecurity bill in the Senate are putting on a full-court press to hold a vote as soon as possible.

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Stopping Congress from screwing up the Internet, again.

Earlier this year, people from all over the Internet rallied to stop SOPA and PIPA, the Internet censorship bills. That was great, but now members of Congress (and the telecom and media companies) are once again trying to destroy the Internet. With SOPA, they tried to give the government wide-ranging authority to shut down huge portions of the Internet. This time they're going to destroy the your privacy. But not if we can help it.

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After indicating that they may veto the House's cybersecurity bill (CISPA) over privacy concerns, the Obama Administration is reaffirming its support for a competing cybersecurity bill in the Senate, the Lieberman-Collins "Cybersecurity Act of 2012." Problem is, the Lieberman-Collins bill is nearly as bad on privacy as CISPA.

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CISPA Rushed to Passage

April 27, 2012 - by Donny Shaw

In a snap vote last night, the House of Representatives passed the controversial Cyberintelligence Sharing and Protection Act, more commonly known as CISPA. The final roll call was 248-168, with most of the Republicans voting in favor and most of the Democrats voting against.

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