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One effect of the structural unemployment situation we are stuck in is that some employers have begun assuming that people who don't have jobs must be bad workers and, therefore, shouldn't be considered for hiring. Of course, that line of logic doesn't comply with the facts of the situation. Since 2008, millions of people really have lost their jobs "through no fault of their own," and the jobs market as a whole has shrunken. The U.S. economy no longer accomodates the U.S. work force. Hence the stagnation in unemployment.

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Every week, 35,000 unemployed Americans reach the end of their insurance benefits without finding new jobs and join the ranks of a growing group of recession victims known as the "99ers." According to the Congressional Budget Office, there are at least 1.4 million 99ers right now, and with the unemployment rate expected to stay high for several years, it's statistically certain that that number will increase dramatically in the coming months.

Given the facts of the situation, some congressional Democrats are pushing legislation to extend the unemployment insurance lifeline to help relieve the hardship these people are facing. On Wednesday, Rep. Barbara Lee [D, CA-9] reintroduced a bill in the new Congress that would add 14 weeks to the current federal unemployment insurance system and provide those benefits retroactively for people who have already exhausted all their benefits. Lee introduced her bill, the Emergency Unemployment Compensation Expansion Act, with 47 co-sponsors -- all Democrats -- and according to rumors she is already up to 60.

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Rep. Berkley Tells 99ers to Keep Waiting

September 23, 2010 - by Donny Shaw

Finally, something like a real update for all the 99ers and unemployed exhaustees out there. Unfortunately, it's not very good. Via Arthur Delaney at HuffPo:

Rep. Shelley Berkley [D, NV] has introduced legislation (H.R. 6091) to help the "99ers" -- people who haven't found work after exhausting all 99 weeks of unemployment benefits available in some states -- but her first priority is preserving those 99 weeks.

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