Department of State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008

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Article summary (how summaries work)
The Department of State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008 priority is the funding of U.S foreign policy budget for programs and initiatives that represent the non-military actions of the U.S. international affairs.[1]


Contents

Details

Military Aid

In the bill, military aid serves as a program that provides loans and grants to purchase U.S. military aid and services, training and support of peacekeeping operations and anti-drug efforts. The Bush administration authroized the bill and denied economic and military aid to countries who adhere to the International Criminal Court requirement. Those who violated the U.S policy, would be brought to trial for Genocide and Crimes against humanity and turned over to the ICC. The U.S. policy is to deny aid unless those countries agree not to apply the requirement to U.S. personnel in the country.[2]

Various countries would be denied military or other aid. Cuba, Libya, North Korea, Iran, Syria and countries seized by military coups would be denied direct loans, credits, insurance and guarantees of the Export-Import Bank or its agents.[3]

Funds for the President

The bill appropriates funds to the president for a variety of programs including disaster and health aid, the provision of peacekeeping support and grants and loans to purchase U.S. military aid. In 2004, The Millennium Challenge Corporation was established through funds allowing the U.S. Government to give aid to the Third World countries. The coorperation supports and enhances economic growth and decreases poverty.President Bush’s provided economic and other aid, which was at $1.2 billion and less than the president had requested. Sudan would receive added humanitarian aid and peacekeeping funds for Darfur.[4]

New Programs

A new initiative to improve drinking water in priority countries is included. The new program, Global Resources and Opportunities for Women to Thrive (GROWTH), intends to enhance “economic opportunities for very poor, poor, and low-income women in developing countries.” The program focuses on increasing women-owned enterprise development, property rights for women, access to financial services and increasing women in leadership in implementing organizations such as indigenous nongovernmental organizations, community-based organizations, and regulated financial intermediaries.[5]

Middle East and Central Asia

Funds are limited to the Palestinian Authority with conditions centered on the type of government, but a traditional presidential waiver continues on those territories that meet certain humanitarian and anti-terrorism conditions.[6]

Afghanistan would receive no less than $1.057 billion for humanitarian, reconstruction, and related assistance. $3 million would be made available for reforestation activities. Funds would be matched, “to the maximum extent possible”, with contributions from American and Afghan businesses. $75 million would be made available to support programs that directly address the needs of Afghan women and girls, including for the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, the Afghan Ministry of Women's Affairs, and for women-led nonprofit organizations in Afghanistan.[7]

Iran is funded for democracy programs at $25 million.[8]

$350 million is appropriated for programs in Pakistan, though the bill expresses concerns about Human rights in Pakistan, especially women's rights, and the pace of reform on democratic governance and rule of law.[9]

$7 million in Foreign Military Financing program funds for Lebanon is recommended, while economic support funds are recommended at $45 million. The bill states that not less than $10 million should be used for scholarships and other direct support of the American educational institutions in Lebanon.[10]


Consideration

House


Amendments

  • The House defeated an amendment related to funding abstinence programs as part of efforts to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS. The amendment sought "to restore the President's emergency plan for AIDS relief authorization provision requiring 33% of HIV/AIDS prevention funding to be spent on abstinence and fidelity promotion program."[11]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Family Research Council 2007-2008 House Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Offered by Rep. Joe Pitts (R-PA), this amendment (H.AMDT. 364) to the State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008 (H.R. 2764) would have restored a carefully negotiated prevention policy which requires a third of HIV/AIDs prevention funding to be spent for “abstinence-until-marriage” and “be-faithful” programs as part of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.frcaction.org/get.cfm?i=VR08I01)

  • The House passed an amendment regarding the use of funding for the distribution of contraceptives. The amendment inserted:
provisions to Section 622 to prevent unintended pregnancies, abortions,and the transmission of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS; and to provide that no contract or grant for exclusive purpose of providing donated contraceptives in developing countries shall be denied to any nongovernmental organization solely on the basis of the policy contained in the President's March 28, 2001, Memorandum to the Administrator of USAID with respect to providing contraceptives in developing countries, or any comparable administration policy regarding the provision of contraceptives.[12]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Family Research Council 2007-2008 House Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Offered by Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY), this amendment (H.AMDT. 367) to the State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008 (H.R. 2764) would have gutted the Mexico City Policy, thus allowing taxpayer funded contraceptives to be given to international organizations that perform and promote abortions as a method of family planning."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.frcaction.org/get.cfm?i=VR08I01)

  • The House defeated an amendment relating to the so-called "Mexico City" policy on family planning by a vote of 218-205.[13]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: American Conservative Union 2007 House Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"The House defeated an amendment to the State Department Appropriations Bill strengthening the “Mexico City” policy, which prohibits U.S. aid to international family planning organizations that perform or promote abortions. ACU supported this amendment."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.acuratings.org/)

Scored vote

Scorecard: Family Research Council 2007-2008 House Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Sponsored by Reps. Chris Smith (R-NJ) and Bart Stupak (D-MI), this amendment (H.AMDT. 368) to the State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008 (H.R. 2764) would have removed language that undermines the Mexico City Policy, and instead, would have upheld the prohibition against federal funding of international organizations that perform or promote abortion as a method of family planning"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.frcaction.org/get.cfm?i=VR08I01)


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Club For Growth 2007 House Scorecard

Org. position: {{{Vote position 1}}}

Description:

"Vote on Jordan amendment that would reduce funding for the State-Foreign Ops appropriations bill by $3 billion. The pro-growth vote was "yea" because a reduction in discretionary spending is badly needed after years of unprecedented growth. Failed 129-301. Failed 152-268."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.clubforgrowth.org/2008/05/the_2007_congressional_scoreca.php)

Passage

On June 21, 2007, the House considered the bill, sponsored by Rep. Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.). It passed, 241-178.[14]



Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Family Research Council 2007-2008 House Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Sponsored by Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY), the State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008 (H.R. 2764) undermines two important policies: first, the Mexico City Policy, which prohibits federal funding for international organizations that perform or promote abortion as a method of family planning; and second, the appropriation of funds for “abstinence-until-marriage” and “be-faithful” programs as part of HIV/AIDs prevention programs in the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.frcaction.org/get.cfm?i=VR08I01)


In late June 2007, Reps. Mark Udall (D-Colo.), Frank Wolf (R-Va.), Christopher Shays (R-Conn.), Michael McCaul (R-Texas) and Daniel Lipinski (D-Ill.) issued a letter to President Bush, urging him to reconstitute the Iraq Study Group. The bipartisan group referred to a provision included in the Foreign Operations appropriations bill passed by the House to provide $1 million to the U.S. Institute for Peace to reestablish the Iraq Study Group. The members worried whether the President would sign the bill with that amendment included. Rep. Udall stated that allowing the group to update their report would give the President, Congress, and the public an independent perspective on the situation in Iraq to compare with the report due by General Petraeus in September.[15]

Senate

Following the August recess, the Senate heavily amended the bill. Amendments included $75 million for democracy programs in Iran, increasing funds through an offsetting cut for democracy radio and television broadcasts to Cuba, and providing for aerial eradication of cocoa in Colombia and funds for alternative crops. Senate authorized the creation of a US-Egypt Friendship in order to improve exchanges between the countries.

Funds to Iraq were prohibited until the State Department reported on the Iraq Government efforts to fight corruption. Also for the purposes of conducting oversight, the Committees on Appropriations were permited to access the State Department data on programs in Iraq.[16]

Spending would be increased or minimum funding amounts set depending on various reports. Those countries included Iraq, Colombia, Bolivia, the Western Sahara region, Nepal, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Indonesia, and countries that recruited child soldiers.[17]

International Military Education and Training for Guatemala was limited to the Guatemalan Air Force and Navy, only if the Secretary of State certified that the Guatemalan Air Force and Navy  respected human rights and coorperated with civilian judicial investigations and prosecutions of military personnel who credibly alleged to commit violations of human rights.[18]

In regard to the realtionship between U.S. and world organizations, the effort to reduce US dues to the UN failed. Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: American Conservative Union 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"The Senate killed an amendment designed to stop an increase in the U.S. share of United Nations peacekeeping costs, which is now 25 percent. ACU opposes increased assistance to the U.N."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.acuratings.org/)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Restrict the U.S. share of the cost of United Nations peacekeeping operations. September 6. (30-63)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/senate_votes.htm)

An effort to prohibit funds to the World Bank for control of Malaria also failed. Both amendments believed that there was a lack of clarity in those organization's management of money and questionable program results.[19]

  • An amendment to prohibit the use of funds by international organizations, agencies, and entities that requires the registration of, or tax guns owned by U.S. citizens was agreed to 81 to 10.[20]
  • An amendment prohibiting funds to organizations that supported coercive abortions or involuntary sterilization passed 48 to 45.


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: American Conservative Union 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"The Senate adopted an amendment that would bar the use of taxpayer money for any organization or program that supports or manages a program of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization. ACU favors such a limitation."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.acuratings.org/)

Scored vote

Scorecard: Family Research Council 2007-2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS) offered an amendment (No. 2707) to the Senate State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008 (H.R. 2764) to strike language in the bill that would have undermined the Kemp-Kasten provision, which since 1985 has prevented funding international groups that support or participate in coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization programs, as determined by the President."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.frcaction.org/get.cfm?i=VR08I01)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Block funding for international groups engaged in coercive abortions, as designated by the U.S. government. September 6. (48-45)"

(Original scorecard available at http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/senate_votes.htm

  • An amendment to revise the bill language and allow for funds to non-governmental organizations that would work to aid women and children victims of human rights violations because of pregnancy or rape and to reverse foreign country programs such as coercive abortion succeeded 53 to 41.[21]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: American Conservative Union 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"The Senate adopted an amendment repealing the Mexico City Policy, which prohibits the use of taxpayer funds by organizations that promote or perform abortions. ACU supports this limitation and opposed the amendment."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.acuratings.org/)

Scored vote

Scorecard: Family Research Council 2007-2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Offered by Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA), this amendment (No. 2719) to the Senate State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008 (H.R. 2764) would have gutted the Mexico City Policy by funding international organizations that perform and promote abortions as a method of family planning."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.frcaction.org/get.cfm?i=VR08I01)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Permit funding for international organizations that perform abortions. September 6. (53-41)"

(Original scorecard available at http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/senate_votes.htm

  • A motion to extend the Alternative Minimum Tax failed by a vote of 48-46 (it needed 60 to pass due to a unanimous consent agreement).


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Block funding for World Bank malaria control and prevention programs. September 6. (33-60)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/senate_votes.htm)

Same for all scorecards:
Scored vote

Scorecard: American Conservative Union 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"The Senate killed a one-year extension of a provision keeping 21 million middle-income taxpayers from being hit with the Alternative Minimum Tax designed to apply to millionaires. ACU favors complete repeal of the AMT, and so opposed this stop-gap measure. The extension was defeated December 18, 2007 by a vote of 48-46. Although the measure did get a majority of the votes cast, under a unanimous consent agreement, 60 votes were required to pass this bill."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.acuratings.org/)

Same for all scorecards:
Scored vote

Scorecard: FreedomWorks 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"This bill contains more than 8,000 earmarks for special-interest projects. In addition to the large amount of earmarks, the bill also contains several budget gimmicks designed to hide the addition $14 billion in unnecessary Congressional spending. “Nay” votes scored."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.freedomworks.org/keyvotes/2007_senate.php)

The Senate passed the bill, as amended, on September 6, 2007, by a vote of 81-12.

Final House votes


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Require the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq. December 18. (24-71; 60 votes required because of a unanimous consent agreement)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/senate_votes.htm)


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Express the sense of Congress that by the end of 2008, the mission of U.S. troops in Iraq should be limited to counter-terrorism, training Iraqi security forces, and force protection. December 18. (50-45; 60 votes required because of a unanimous consent agreement)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/senate_votes.htm)


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Add $70 billion to a fiscal 2008 omnibus spending package to pay for the Iraq war through the spring of 2008. December 18. (70-25; 60 votes required because of a unanimous consent agreement)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/senate_votes.htm)

After the Senate passed its version of the bill, the House considered the Senate's amendment. On December 17, 2007, the House voted to accept the Senate amendment and added two amendments of its own in two separate votes.[22] The first vote passed by a margin of 253-154.



Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Club For Growth 2007 House Scorecard

Org. position: {{{Vote position 1}}}

Description:

"Vote on the proposal that would providing funding for most parts of the discretionary federal budget. The pro-growth vote was "nay" because the bill was stuffed with pork, was over the President's spending limit, and because it used accounting gimmicks to artificially reduce the bill's cost. Passed 253-154."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.clubforgrowth.org/2008/05/the_2007_congressional_scoreca.php)

Scored vote

Scorecard: American Conservative Union 2007 House Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"The House passed a year-end appropriations bill, known as the “Omnibus Appropriations Bill,” incorporating appropriations for 18 separate federal departments in a $474 billion package. The measure included major spending increases over and above increases requested by the Bush Administration. ACU opposes this kind of last-minute government spending."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.acuratings.org/)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 House Scorecard

Org. position: {{{Vote position 3}}}

Description:

"Approve the fiscal 2008 omnibus spending package, which mostly complied with President Bush's overall spending ceiling. December 17. (253-154)"

(Original scorecard available at http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/house_votes.htm


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 House Scorecard

Org. position: {{{Vote position 1}}}

Description:

"Approve the fiscal 2008 omnibus spending package, with $31 billion for military operations in Afghanistan only and funds to buy protective equipment for troops serving overseas. December 17. (206-201)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/house_votes.htm)


After the Senate concurred with the House amendments, the bill returned to the House where it passed it on December 19, 2007, by a vote of 272-142.[23]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2007 House Scorecard

Org. position: {{{Vote position 1}}}

Description:

"Approve the fiscal 2008 omnibus spending package, including $70 billion to pay for the Iraq and Afghanistan wars through the spring of 2008. December 19. (272-142)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/house_votes.htm)

Articles and resources

See also

References

  1. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  2. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  3. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  4. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  5. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  6. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  7. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  8. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  9. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  10. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  11. THOMAS info page on H.AMDT. 364
  12. THOMAS info page H.AMDT.367
  13. THOMAS page on H.AMDT.368.
  14. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  15. Jeremy Jacobs, "Lawmakers want to bring Iraq Study Group back," The Hill, June 30, 2007.
  16. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  17. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  18. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  19. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  20. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  21. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Appropriations," TheWeekInCongress, June 22, 2007.
  22. THOMAS pages on H.R. 2764 and H.RES.878.
  23. OpenCongress' info page on H.R.2764.

External resources

External articles

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