FY 2009 U.S. federal budget

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Summary (how summaries work)
On February 4, 2008, President George W. Bush submitted (as is customary for a president to do so) a budget request to the U.S. Congress for fiscal year (FY) 2009. It would amount to $3.1 trillion in federal spending, and trim spending on several domestic programs while eliminating others. In addition, his proposal would make permanent the tax cuts passed during his first term and increase defense spending by 5 percent.[1]


Contents

Background

Funding for the government is provided by Congress under Article I, Section 9, Clause 7 of the Constitution. This is the "purse strings power" and there are no exceptions to it. Absent appropriations made by law, no operations by the government may take place: government employees may not work without pay and those who would contract with the government may not "volunteer" their goods or services.

Funding for government employees salaries and wages(including the President) is provided in "one year" funds which expire at the end of a fiscal year. While Congress may pass "continuing resolutions" providing some interim funding where appropriations are not timely enacted, in the absence of such continuing resolutions no government employee may work.

Current status

FY 2009 Appropriations Bills [2]
Appropriations House Approvals Senate Approvals Conference Approvals Public Law
Committee Report Comm. Vote House Vote Committee Report Comm. Vote Senate Vote Conf. Report House Vote Senate Vote
Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations Act, 2009

(Continuing Resolution through 3/6/09) H.R. 2638

Budget Resolution

HConRes312
SConRes70

H.Rept. 110-543 3/06/08 3/13/08 Vote Summary S.Cmte.Print 110-39 3/06/08 3/14/08 Vote Details H.Rept. 110-659 6/05/08 Vote Details 6/04/08 Vote Details President does not sign
Agriculture

S3289

S.Rept. 110-426 7/18/08
Commerce/ Justice/ Science

S3182

H.Rept. 110-240 6/25/08 S.Rept. 110-397 6/19/08
Defense
Energy & Water

S3258

6/25/08 S.Rept. 110-416 7/10/08
Financial Services

S3260

6/25/08 S.Rept. 110-417 7/10/08
Homeland Security

S3181

6/24/08 S.Rept. 110-396 6/19/08
Interior & Environment
Labor/ HHS/ Education

S3230

S.Rept. 110-410 6/26/08
Legislative Branch
Military/Veterans

H6599
S3301

H.Rept. 110-775 6/24/08 8/1/08
Rule 1384
S.Rept. 110-428 7/17/08
State/Foreign Operations

S3288

S.Rept.110-425 7/18/08
Transportation/HUD

S3261

S.Rept. 110-418 7/10/08


Debate and passage

House

On March 13, 2008, the House passed its original version of the FY2009 budget resolution by a vote of 212-207.


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Americans for Democratic Action 2008 House Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Adoption of the concurrent resolution to allow discretionary spending of up to $1 trillion in fiscal 2009, plus $70 billion for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and $5.8 billion for hurricane recovery, while assuming a budget surplus in fiscal 2012 and 2013. It would call on the Ways and Means Committee to report two bills: one to reduce fiscal 2009 revenue by $70 billion, allowing for an AMT patch, offset over five years; and the other to reduce mandatory spending by $750 million over six years. Adopted 212-207. March 13, 2008. A yes vote is a +."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.adaction.org/pages/publications/voting-records.php)

Prior to passing the resolution, the House rejected a substitute proposal offered as an amendment by Rep. Carolyn Kilpatrick (D-Mich.) on behalf of the Congressional Black Caucus by a vote of 126-292. Among the provisions of the substitute proposal were the repeal of the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts on incomes over $200,000 and increased funding for education.[3]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Americans for Democratic Action 2008 House Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Fiscal 2009 Budget Resolution -- Congressional Black Caucus Substitute: Kilpatrick (D-MI) substitute amendment that would achieve a budget surplus of $183 billion in fiscal 2012 by repealing the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts for households with incomes over $200,000 and by repealing certain corporate tax breaks, while increasing funds for health care, education and job training programs, and veteran benefits and services."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.adaction.org/pages/publications/voting-records.php)

Americans for Democratic Action, which supported the amendment, selected the vote for their 2008 House scorecard, where they gave it the following description:

Fiscal 2009 Budget Resolution -- Congressional Black Caucus Substitute: Kilpatrick (D-MI) substitute amendment that would achieve a budget surplus of $183 billion in fiscal 2012 by repealing the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts for households with incomes over $200,000 and by repealing certain corporate tax breaks, while increasing funds for health care, education and job training programs, and veteran benefits and services.[4]

The House later passed a resolution on May 14, 2008, adopting the Senate's budget resolution S. Con. Res. 70 for fiscal year 2009, sending the bill to conference committee.


Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.) offered a motion to give instructions to the conferees, but the motion to instruct failed to pass.


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 House Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Instruct conferees to assume $2 billion in additional revenues from oil development, including in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. May 14. (185-229)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

Senate

On March 14, 2008, the Senate passed the resolution as amended by a vote of 51-44.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Americans for Democratic Action 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Adoption of the concurrent resolution setting broad spending and revenue targets over the next five years (including provisions noted above). The resolution would allow up to $1 trillion in discretionary spending for 2009, including a $35 billion economic stimulus package, a one-year alternative minimum tax “patch,” and allow for the extension of certain 2001 and 2003 tax cuts, including the 10 percent tax bracket and the child tax credit."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.adaction.org/pages/publications/voting-records.php)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Adopt the Democrats' fiscal 2009 budget resolution"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

Amendments

Prior to that passage, several amendments were considered.

  • Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) proposed an amendment to raise the exemption to the estate tax (to $5 million) and to extend other tax cuts related to capital gains.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Extend some of the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts and limit the estate tax."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) proposed an amendment "to add a deficit-neutral reserve fund for repealing the 1993 rate increase for the alternative minimum tax for individuals."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Create a mechanism to offset reductions in the alternative minimum tax with tax hikes or spending cuts"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) proposed an amendment to repeal part of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993 and thus restore the prior Alternative Minimum Tax rates.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Americans for Democratic Action 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Specter (R-PA) amendment to adjust the budget resolution to reduce the individual alternative minimum tax from its current, more progressive two-rate structure of 26 percent and 28 percent to the single 24 percent rate that was in effect prior to 1993. The revenue loss would not be offset."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.adaction.org/pages/publications/voting-records.php)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Reduce the alternative minimum tax without budgetary offsets."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Ken Salazar (D-Colo.) proposed an amendment "to reform the estate tax to avoid subjecting thousands of families, family businesses, and family farms and ranches to the estate tax." [5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Reduce the estate tax with budgetary offsets."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) proposed an amendment "to add a deficit-neutral reserve fund for repealing the 1993 increase in the income tax on Social Security benefits."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Allow for the repeal of a 1993 tax increase on Social Security benefits."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.) proposed an amendment "to increase the Indian Health Service by $1 billion in FY 2009."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Increase Indian Health Service funding by $1 billion."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) proposed an amendment "to establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve energy efficiency and production."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Create a mechanism to offset the cost of certain energy-efficiency and -production requirements."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) proposed an amendment to transfer $670,000 from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to the Department of Education for the teaching of English to adults through the English Literacy/Civics Education State Grant program.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Americans for Democratic Action 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Alexander (R-TN) amendment that would shift $670,000 from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to the Department of Education’s English Literacy-Civics Education State Grant program. (The amendment restricts the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from taking enforcement actions against English-only rules in the workplace where the employer’s policy has no business justification.)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.adaction.org/pages/publications/voting-records.php)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Set aside funding for limited immigration enforcement and reform."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) proposed an amendment "to establish a reserve fund for immigration reform and enforcement."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Set aside funding for limited immigration enforcement and reform."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) proposed an amendment "to establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund for border security, immigration enforcement, and criminal alien removal programs."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Set aside funding for tougher immigration enforcement"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) proposed an amendment "to protect the family budget by providing for a budget point of order against legislation that increases income taxes on taxpayers, including hard-working middle-income families, entrepreneurs, and college students."[5]


U.S. Senate record vote 61, 109th Congress, Session 2

  • Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.) proposed an amendment "to require wealthy Medicare beneficiaries to pay a greater share of their Medicare Part D premiums." [5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Require wealthy Medicare recipients to pay higher prescription drug premiums."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) proposed an amendment "to put children ahead of millionaires and billionaires by restoring the pre-2001 top income tax rate for people earning over $1 million, and use this revenue to invest in LIHEAP; IDEA; Head Start; Child Care; nutrition; school construction and deficit reduction." [5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Increase income taxes for millionaires and use the extra money for special education, low-income energy assistance, Head Start, and other programs"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) proposed an amendment "to provide for a deficit-neutral reserve fund for Social Security reform."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Set up a prohibition on tapping into the Social Security trust fund."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Wayne Allard (R-Colo.) proposed an amendment "to pay down the Federal debt and eliminate government waste by reducing spending 5 percent on programs rated (as mandated under the Government Performance and Results Act (Public Law 103-62)) ineffective by the Office of Management and Budget Program Assessment Rating Tool."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Cut funding for programs rated ineffective by the Office of Management and Budget."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kan.) proposed an amendment "to provide funds for a Commission on Budgetary Accountability and Review of Federal Agencies."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Create a federal agency closing commission modeled after the base closure commission"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) proposed an amendment "to create a reserve fund to ensure that Federal assistance does not go to sanctuary cities that ignore the immigration laws of the United States and create safe havens for illegal aliens and potential terrorists." The Senate agreed to table the amendment.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Kill an amendment that would restrict funding for local law enforcement agencies that don't help track down illegal immigrants."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.) proposed an amendment to provide $50 million in increased funding for the Department of Justice's efforts to enforce the Child Custody Act.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Americans for Democratic Action 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Ensign (R-NV) amendment to increase Justice Department funding by $50 million for parental notification law enforcement, with assumed corresponding offsets."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.adaction.org/pages/publications/voting-records.php)

  • Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) proposed an amendment "to establish an earmark moratorium for fiscal year 2009."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Waive budget rules to establish an earmark moratorium for fiscal 2009. March 13. (29-71; 60 votes required to waive the Budget Act)"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Jim DeMint proposed an amendment to shift additional funding to the Marine Corps.[5]


U.S. Senate record vote 79, 110th Congress, Session 2

  • Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) proposed an amendment to expand coverage of SCHIP to pregnant women.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Americans for Democratic Action 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Boxer (D-CA) amendment to permit legislation allowing pregnant women to be eligible for coverage under the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP)."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.adaction.org/pages/publications/voting-records.php)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Extend the State Children's Health Insurance Program to cover pregnant women."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. Wayne Allard (R-Colo.) proposed an amendment "to require that legislation to reauthorize SCHIP include provisions codifying the unborn child regulation."[6]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Family Research Council 2007-2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Senator Wayne Allard (R-CO) offered an amendment (No. 4223) to the Budget Resolution (S.Con.Res. 70) that would codify the “Unborn Child Rule” which allows states the option of providing health care insurance for unborn children under the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP)."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.frcaction.org/get.cfm?i=VR08I01)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Change the definition of "child" under Social Security to cover fetuses."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)


  • Sen. Joe Biden (D-Del.) proposed an amendment "to restore full funding for the international affairs budget, in support of the reconstruction of Iraq and Afghanistan, nuclear nonproliferation, foreign assistance, fighting global AIDS, promoting sustainable development, and other efforts, with an offset."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Increase funding for foreign affairs programs."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

  • Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) proposed an amendment "expressing the sense of the Senate regarding the need for comprehensive legislation to legalize the importation of prescription drugs from highly industrialized countries with safe pharmaceutical infrastructures."[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Express the sense of the Senate that the legalization of prescription drug importation should be debated"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

Passage of the conference report

Senate motions to instruct conferees

Prior to entering discussions with the House, the Senate considered motions to instruct the conferees regarding language to be included in the report.

Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) proposed a motion to instruct conferees that "no legislation providing for new mandates on greenhouse gas emissions should be enacted until it effectively addresses imports from China, India, and other nations that have no similar emissions programs."[7]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Instruct conferees to deal with foreign imports before setting up greenhouse-gas emissions rules."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) proposed a motion that would have instructed conferees to

insist that the conference report include a reserve fund that requires the Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee to adjust budget aggregates and the allocation of the Energy Committee, if the Senate considers legislation that allows a Governor, with the concurrence of the State legislature to petition for increased energy exploration on the Outer Continental Shelf and that allows for revenue sharing for such producing States on new areas of production and new leases made available, if the average price of regular gasoline in the United States reaches $5 per gallon.[8]

Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: League of Conservation Voters 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"In 1981, Congress acted to protect America’s shores, beaches, and marine ecosystems by adopting a moratorium on oil and gas development in coastal waters. Congress has continued this protection every year since then. During Senate consideration of the Fiscal 2009 budget resolution, Senator David Vitter (R-LA) offered a motion to instruct conferees to insist that conference report language be adjusted to allow governors, with the concurrence of their state legislatures, to petition for allowing increased drilling along their beaches and shorelines. The moratorium on offshore drilling was later allowed to expire in the continuing budget resolution."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.lcv.org/2008-pdf.pdf)

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Instruct conferees to set aside funding for offshore drilling exploration"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.) proposed a motion to instruct conferees "to bring this budget back under the trillion-dollar level in the discretionary side." "[9]

Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: National Journal 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Nay

Description:

"Instruct conferees to adhere to a $1 trillion cap on discretionary spending"

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/cs_20090228_4813.php)

Senate

On June 4, 2008, the Senate voted 48-45 to approve the conference report for the FY 2009 budget resolution, which also sets the budget levels for FY2008 and FY2010-FY2013.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: Americans for Democratic Action 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"Adoption of the conference report on the concurrent resolution to allow up to $1 trillion in discretionary spending for fiscal 2009, plus $70 billion for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and $5.8 billion for hurricane recovery. It would assume $1.9 trillion in mandatory spending and increase of the statutory debt limit to $10.615 trillion. It would create a “trigger” mechanism that would reinforce pay-as-you-go rules in the House. The measure assumes a one-year alternative minimum tax “patch” that would be offset. It also would require 60 votes to increase the deficit by $10 billion in a year."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.adaction.org/pages/publications/voting-records.php)

Scored vote

Scorecard: League of Conservation Voters 2008 Senate Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"The Congressional budget process begins once the President’s annual budget is submitted in February. At that time, Congress begins to develop its own budget plan that reflects its spending priorities. The federal budget resolution sets funding levels for the next fiscal year and sets forth budget totals for the next five years. Because the concurrent budget resolution determines the spending authority of House appropriation committees that then subdivide the amount among its subcommittees, the federal budget is a powerful tool for establishing national policy priorities. Programs that protect our air, water, climate, wildlife, parks, forest, refuges, and other public lands fall under the Interior-Environment Appropriation Committee. S. Con Res 70 marks the second year of reversing cuts to many important environmental and conservation programs that occurred for nearly a decade. The budget agreement provides $38.6 billion in FY 2009 discretionary spending for environment and natural resources programs. This funding level is $1.9 billion above the FY 2008 enacted level, and $3.9 billion over the President’s FY 2009 request. The resolution also provides $7.7 billion for energy programs in FY 2009, which is $2.8 billion above the President’s proposal. This is a major improvement over the years of depleting funding for important public lands and natural resource management."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.lcv.org/2008-pdf.pdf)

House

The House then approved the conference report the following day by a vote of 214-210.[5]


Same for all scorecards:

Scored vote

Scorecard: League of Conservation Voters 2008 House Scorecard

Org. position: Aye

Description:

"The Congressional budget process begins once the President’s annual budget is submitted in February. At that time, Congress begins to develop its own budget plan that reflects its spending priorities. The federal budget resolution sets funding levels for the next fiscal year and sets forth budget totals for the next five years. Because the concurrent budget resolution determines the spending authority of House appropriation committees that then subdivide the amount among its subcommittees, the federal budget is a powerful tool for establishing national policy priorities. Programs that protect our air, water, climate, wildlife, parks, forest, refuges and other public lands fall under the Interior Environment Appropriation Committee. S. Con Res 70 marks the second year of reversing cuts to many important environmental and conservation programs that occurred for nearly a decade. The budget agreement provides $38.6 billion in FY 2009 discretionary spending for environment and natural resources programs. This funding level is $1.9 billion above the FY 2008 enacted level, and $3.9 billion over the President’s FY 2009 request. The resolution also provides $7.7 billion for energy programs in FY 2009, which is $2.8 billion above the President’s proposal. This is a major improvement over the years of declining funding for important public lands and natural resource management."

(Original scorecard available at: http://www.lcv.org/2008-pdf.pdf)

Articles and resources

See also

References

  1. Michael Abramowitz and Jonathan Weisman,"President's Spending Plan Would Rival 2004 Deficit," The Washington Post, February 4, 2008.
  2. "Status of Appropriations Legislation for Fiscal Year 2009, Library of Congress's Thomas site. Latest capture and update: August 13, 2008.
  3. Remarks of Rep. Carolyn Kilpatrick (D-Mich.), Congressional Record, March 13, 2008, H1635.
  4. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 5.12 5.13 5.14 5.15 5.16 5.17 5.18 5.19 5.20 5.21 5.22 5.23 5.24 5.25 OpenCongress' info page on "Budget resolution FY2009"
  5. THOMAS' info page on S.AMDT.4233
  6. Remarks of Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), Congressional Record, May 15, 2008,[1]
  7. Remarks of Sen. David Vitter (R-La.), Congressional Record, May 15, 2008, S4258-S4259.
  8. Remarks of Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), Congressional Record, May 15, 2008, [2]

External resources

External articles

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