Hillary Clinton: U.S. presidential election, 2008/campaign team

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File:Hillary.jpg
Hillary Rodham Clinton, U.S. Senator (D-N.Y.)
This article is part of the
SourceWatch and Congresspedia coverage
of Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.) and
the 2008 presidential election
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The following relates to the campaign team and advisers for Hillary Clinton.


Contents

National leadership

Senior consultant: Mark J. Penn

The Wall Street Journal first reported on April 4, 2008, that Penn "met with Colombia's ambassador to the U.S. on Monday to discuss a bilateral free-trade agreement, a pact the presidential candidate (Clinton) opposes." Burson-Marsteller "has a contract with the South American nation to promote congressional approval of the trade deal." The New York Times later noted that Penn apologized for his conflict of loyalty saying "the meeting was an error in judgment." [1]

"If Clinton seems cautious, it may be because Penn has made caution a science, repeatedly testing issues to determine which ones are safe and widely agreed upon (he was part of the team that encouraged Clinton's husband to run on the issue of school uniforms in 1996)," Anne E. Kornblut wrote April 30, 2007, in the Washington Post.

"If Clinton sounds middle-of-the-road, it may be because Penn is a longtime pollster for the centrist Democratic Leadership Council whose clients have included Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman (I-Conn.).

"If Clinton resembles a Washington insider with close ties to the party's biggest donors, it may be because her lead strategist is a wealthy chief executive who heads (Burson-Marsteller) a giant public relations firm, where he personally hones Microsoft's image in Washington.

"And if some opponents see Clinton as arrogant, her campaign a coronation rather than a grass-roots movement, it may be because of the numbers wizard guiding her campaign and the PowerPoint presentations he likes to give on the inevitability of his candidate.

"Yet Penn also has everything that Clinton would want in a senior consultant: undisputed brilliance and experience, according to even his enemies; clear opinions, with data to back them up; unwavering loyalty; and a relentless focus on the endgame: winning the general election. And Clinton clearly adores him. She describes Penn in her autobiography, Living History, as brilliant, intense, shrewd and insightful," Kornblut wrote.

Campaign team members

The following have been identified as Clinton's campaign team members:

Foreign policy team

Clinton is "regarded as by far the more conservative candidate in that she has carefully triangulated her potential supporters and is unwilling to say that her vote in the Senate in support of the Iraq war was a mistake. She has also positioned herself with the Israel lobby through her pledge to disarm Iran by whatever means necessary and her threat to use nuclear weapons on terrorists. Her foreign policy advisers are a who's who of neoliberal hawks, including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, who famously believed that the deaths of 500,000 Iraqi children due to sanctions was 'worth it.' Clinton is also being advised by Richard Holbrooke, who is reported to be close to Paul Wolfowitz. Holbrooke is a possible candidate for secretary of state if Clinton is elected president. Holbrooke has been a supporter of the Iraq war, and he was an architect of the 1999 bombing of Serbia. Strobe Talbott, who advised Bill Clinton and was also involved with the bombing of Serbia, is reported to be another Hillary adviser," Philip Giraldi wrote August 14, 2007, at Antiwar.com.[10] TheRealNews.com has a report on Hillary Clinton's foreign policy advisors [3].

In October 2007, the Washington Post published a list of Clinton's foreign policy advisers.[11]

Resources

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Wendy Melillo, "Clinton's Ad Team Comes Into Focus," Adweek, January 29, 2007.
  2. Thomas M. DeFrank, "Meet Maggie Williams, Hillary Clinton's new campaign manager," New York Daily News, February 11, 2008.
  3. Beth Fouhy, "Clinton: Staff Change Not Significant," Associated Press, February 11, 2008.
  4. Michelle Cottle, "The Enforcer. Hillary Clinton's consigliere speaks," The New Republic, September 14, 2007.
  5. Jason Horowitz, "Plop, Plop! Fizz! Clinton Ad Team Packages Hillary. Mandy Grunwald’s Crew Cues Farmer, Hug, Music; The ‘Invisible’ Commercial," The New York Observer, September 25, 2007.
  6. "Clinton camp taps Hattaway," The Swamp/Baltimore Sun, December 19, 2007.
  7. Lynn Sweet, "Clinton taps Chicago's Bob Nash as deputy campaign manager," Chicago Sun-Times, March 20, 2007.
  8. Sudeep Balla, "NRI appointed Hillary Clinton campaign's policy director of 2008 presidential election," NRI Internet, January 26, 2007.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Marc Ambinder, "Clinton campaign shakes up Iowa staff," The Atlantic, June 5, 2007.
  10. Philip Giraldi, "Neolibs and Neocons, United and Interchangeable," Antiwar.com, August 14, 2007.
  11. 11.00 11.01 11.02 11.03 11.04 11.05 11.06 11.07 11.08 11.09 11.10 11.11 11.12 11.13 11.14 11.15 11.16 11.17 11.18 11.19 11.20 11.21 "The War Over the Wonks," Washington Post, October 2, 2007.

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