Jim Cooper

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U.S. Representative

Jim Cooper (D)

400081.jpeg

TN-05
Positions
Leadership: No leadership position
Committees: House Committee on Armed Services, House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform
(subcommittees and past assignments)
Next election: Nov. 6, 2012

Primary challenge: No

Incumbent running: Yes

2012 candidates for TN-05

Confirmed: Brad Staats, Jim Cooper
Possible: None so far
Out: None so far
(more info & editing for TN-05)
On the Web
Official website


James Hayes Shofner "Jim Cooper, a Democrat, has represented the Fifth Congressional District of Tennessee in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2002.

Contents

Record and controversies

Congressional scorecards

Click through the score to see the records of other members of Congress and full descriptions of the individual votes.

Want to see someone else's scorecard added to the list? You can do it!

Organization 2007 Scorecard
Score - Agree ratio
2008 Scorecard
Score - Agree ratio
American Civil Liberties Union not avail. not avail.
American Conservative Union 16 - 4/25 not avail.
AFSCME not avail. not avail.
Americans for Democratic Action 85 - 17/20 60 - 12/20
Club for Growth not avail. not avail.
Drum Major Institute not avail. not avail.
Family Research Council not avail. not avail.
Information Technology Industry Council not avail. not avail.
League of Conservation Voters not avail. not avail.
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People not avail. not avail.
U.S. Chamber of Commerce 75 - 15/20 not avail.


Iraq War

For more information see the chart of U.S. House of Representatives votes on the Iraq War.

Environmental record

For more information on environmental legislation, see the Energy and Environment Policy Portal

Bio

Cooper was born July 19, 1954 in Shelbyville, Tennessee. He is the son of former governor of Tennessee Prentice Cooper. He graduated from the University of North Carolina, University of Oxford and the Harvard University Law School.

In 1982, he won the Democratic primary for the new 4th Congressional District, which had been created when Tennessee gained a district after the 1980 census.

In 1994, Cooper left the U.S. House and ran unsuccessfully for the Senate for the seat left open when Al Gore was elected Vice President. He lost to Republican attorney and actor Fred Thompson in an overwhelming landslide, receiving well under 40% of the vote.

Cooper got another opportunity to run for the U.S. House in 2002 when Fifth District Congressman Bob Clement decided to run for Thompson's Senate seat in 2002 after Thompson opted not to run for a second full term. Cooper entered the Democratic primary along with several other prominent local Democrats. Cooper won the primary with 44 percent of the vote, all but assuring him of a return to Congress after an eight-year absence. He won handily in November and was reelected almost as easily in 2004 against a Republican who ran only a token campaign and disavowed his party's national ticket. Given the heavy Democratic tilt of the 5th, it is very unlikely that Cooper will face a serious or well-funded Republican opponent in the forseeable future.

2006 elections

No major candidates announced their intentions to contest Cooper’s seat in the November 2006 election. (See U.S. congressional elections in 2006) [1]

Money in politics

This section contains links to – and feeds from – money in politics databases. For specific controversies, see this article's record and controversies section.

Top Contributors to during the 2008 Election Cycle
DonorAmount (US Dollars)
Bass, Berry & Sims$ 14,150
Vanderbilt University$ 11,800
Rogers Group$ 10,400
Blue Dog PAC$ 10,000
Deloitte LLP$ 10,000
Plumbers/Pipefitters Union$ 10,000
Hercules Holding$ 8,700
Schatten Properties$ 7,800
Waller, Lansden et al$ 7,700
Frank Neal & Co$ 6,700
Source: The Center for Responsive Politics' www.OpenSecrets.org site.
Note: Contributions are not from the organizations themselves, but are rather from
the organization's PAC, employees or owners. Totals include subsidiaries and affiliates.
Links to more campaign contribution information for Jim Cooper
from the Center for Responsive Politics' OpenSecrets.org site.
Fundraising profile: 2008 election cycle Career totals
Top contributors by organization/corporation: 2008 election cycle Career totals
Top contributors by industry: 2008 election cycle Career totals


Committees and Affiliations

Committees

Committees in the 110th Congress (2007-2008)

Committee assignments in the 109th Congress (2005-2006)

More Background Data

Wikipedia also has an article on Jim Cooper. This article may use content from the Wikipedia article under the terms of the GFDL.

Contact

DC office
  • 1536 Longworth House Office Building Washington, DC 20515
    Ph: 202-225-4311 Fax: 202-226-1035
    Webform email
District offices
  • 2598 North Mount Juliet Road, Suite 100, Mount Juliet, TN 37122
    Ph: 615-773-2305 Fax: (none entered)
  • 706 Church Street, Suite 101, Nashville, TN 37203
    Ph: 615-736-5295 Fax: (none entered)
On the Web
Campaign office
  • No campaign website entered.
  • No campaign webform email entered.
  • No campaign office information entered.

Articles and resources

Local blogs and discussion sites

Semantic data (Edit data)

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