Property:American Civil Liberties Union 2008 House Scorecard description

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Pages using the property "American Civil Liberties Union 2008 House Scorecard description"

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S.181: Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 +On January 9, 2009, the House passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act (H.R. 11) by a vote of 247 to 171. The ACLU supported this legislation, which would allow employees who have suffered pay discrimination to seek vindication without facing unduly and unfairly restrictive deadlines. The legislation addresses wage disparities based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, and disability, clarifying that such discrimination is not a one-time occurrence that starts and ends with a pay decision, but that each paycheck represents a continuing violation by an employer.
Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2009 +On April 29, 2009, the House passed the Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2009 (H.R. 1913) by a vote of 249 to 175. The ACLU supported this legislation because it would expand the federal criminal civil rights statute to punish violent acts committed against a person because of his or her sexual orientation, gender identity, gender or disability. It also included important First Amendment free speech and association protections by prohibiting the use of evidence of a person's speech or membership to prove the crime unless the evidence was specifically related to the violent offense. These would be the strongest protections against the misuse of a person's exercise of free speech rights that Congress has ever enacted as part of the federal criminal code.

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National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 +On June 25, 2009, the House passed, by a vote of 224-193, an anti-torture amendment offered by Representative Rush Holt (D-NJ) to the National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 2647) that would require the recording and retention of videos of interrogations of persons under the control of the Department of Defense, or being held at Defense Department facilities. The amendment would bring interrogations into line with recommended best practices for both military and law enforcement interrogations, increasing accountability for compliance with the McCain Anti-Torture Amendment, President Obama's Executive Order prohibiting torture and abuse, the Army Field Manual on Interrogations and other federal anti-torture laws and treaties. The ACLU supported the Holt Amendment because it takes important and needed steps in returning accountability and the rule of law to the federal government's interrogation and detention policies.

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Paycheck Fairness Act +On January 9, 2009, the House defeated a motion to recommit the Paycheck Fairness Act (H.R. 12) by a vote of 240 to 178. The ACLU opposed the motion to recommit, which would have placed a cap on the attorneys' fees a prevailing plaintiff could receive under the Equal Pay Act. The Paycheck Fairness Act is intended to strengthen the Equal Pay Act, not limit the ability of those suffering pay discrimination to get the legal help necessary to ensure they receive their rightfully earned wages., On January 9, 2009, the House passed the Paycheck Fairness Act (H.R. 12) by a vote of 256 to 163. The ACLU supported this legislation, which would amend the Equal Pay Act, one of the most important laws addressing pay discrimination. In particular, it would strengthen the Act by requiring employers to demonstrate that wage differences among employees, who hold the same position and do the same work, stem from factors other than sex; strengthening penalties for violations; bolstering the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's (EEOC) ability to handle pay discrimination cases; and requiring the EEOC to develop regulations directing employers to collect wage data of employees, reported by race, sex and national origin.

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Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act +On June 4, 2009, the House passed an amendment offered by Representatives Chaffetz (R-UT) and Shea-Porter (D-NH) to the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act (H.R. 2200) by a vote of 310-118. The Chaffetz-Shea-Porter Amendment prohibits the use of whole-body imaging technology, which produces graphic and detailed images of aircraft passengers' bodies, as the sole or primary method of screening. Rather, it permits such imaging only when metal detection or other methods of screening demonstrate cause. The ACLU supported this amendment because of the Fourth Amendment and other privacy protections it affords aircraft passengers.

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U.S. House of Representatives record vote 223, 111th Congress, Session 1 +On April 29, 2009, the House passed the Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2009 (H.R. 1913) by a vote of 249 to 175. The ACLU supported this legislation because it would expand the federal criminal civil rights statute to punish violent acts committed against a person because of his or her sexual orientation, gender identity, gender or disability. It also included important First Amendment free speech and association protections by prohibiting the use of evidence of a person's speech or membership to prove the crime unless the evidence was specifically related to the violent offense. These would be the strongest protections against the misuse of a person's exercise of free speech rights that Congress has ever enacted as part of the federal criminal code.
U.S. House of Representatives record vote 305, 111th Congress, Session 1 +On June 4, 2009, the House passed an amendment offered by Representatives Chaffetz (R-UT) and Shea-Porter (D-NH) to the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act (H.R. 2200) by a vote of 310-118. The Chaffetz-Shea-Porter Amendment prohibits the use of whole-body imaging technology, which produces graphic and detailed images of aircraft passengers' bodies, as the sole or primary method of screening. Rather, it permits such imaging only when metal detection or other methods of screening demonstrate cause. The ACLU supported this amendment because of the Fourth Amendment and other privacy protections it affords aircraft passengers.
U.S. House of Representatives record vote 37, 111th Congress, Session 1 +On January 27, 2009, the House passed the Senate-passed version the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act (S. 181) by a vote of 250 to 177. The ACLU supported this legislation, which would allow employees who have suffered pay discrimination to seek vindication without facing unduly and unfairly restrictive deadlines. The legislation addresses wage disparities based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, and disability, clarifying that such discrimination is not a one-time occurrence that starts and ends with a pay decision, but that each paycheck represents a continuing violation by an employer.
U.S. House of Representatives record vote 457, 111th Congress, Session 1 +On June 25, 2009, the House passed, by a vote of 224-193, an anti-torture amendment offered by Representative Rush Holt (D-NJ) to the National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 2647) that would require the recording and retention of videos of interrogations of persons under the control of the Department of Defense, or being held at Defense Department facilities. The amendment would bring interrogations into line with recommended best practices for both military and law enforcement interrogations, increasing accountability for compliance with the McCain Anti-Torture Amendment, President Obama's Executive Order prohibiting torture and abuse, the Army Field Manual on Interrogations and other federal anti-torture laws and treaties. The ACLU supported the Holt Amendment because it takes important and needed steps in returning accountability and the rule of law to the federal government's interrogation and detention policies.
U.S. House of Representatives record vote 7, 111th Congress, Session 1 +On January 9, 2009, the House defeated a motion to recommit the Paycheck Fairness Act (H.R. 12) by a vote of 240 to 178. The ACLU opposed the motion to recommit, which would have placed a cap on the attorneys' fees a prevailing plaintiff could receive under the Equal Pay Act. The Paycheck Fairness Act is intended to strengthen the Equal Pay Act, not limit the ability of those suffering pay discrimination to get the legal help necessary to ensure they receive their rightfully earned wages.
U.S. House of Representatives record vote 8, 111th Congress, Session 1 +On January 9, 2009, the House passed the Paycheck Fairness Act (H.R. 12) by a vote of 256 to 163. The ACLU supported this legislation, which would amend the Equal Pay Act, one of the most important laws addressing pay discrimination. In particular, it would strengthen the Act by requiring employers to demonstrate that wage differences among employees, who hold the same position and do the same work, stem from factors other than sex; strengthening penalties for violations; bolstering the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's (EEOC) ability to handle pay discrimination cases; and requiring the EEOC to develop regulations directing employers to collect wage data of employees, reported by race, sex and national origin.
U.S. House of Representatives record vote 9, 111th Congress, Session 1 +On January 9, 2009, the House passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act (H.R. 11) by a vote of 247 to 171. The ACLU supported this legislation, which would allow employees who have suffered pay discrimination to seek vindication without facing unduly and unfairly restrictive deadlines. The legislation addresses wage disparities based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, and disability, clarifying that such discrimination is not a one-time occurrence that starts and ends with a pay decision, but that each paycheck represents a continuing violation by an employer.
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