Public Safety and Recreational Firearms Use Protection Act

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The Public Safety and Recreational Firearms Use Protection Act was a federal gun control law passed in the House in 1994. Its provisions were later included in a larger anti-crime bill, the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, which passed both houses and was signed by President Clinton in late 1994.

Main article: U.S. gun control legislation

Contents

Provisions

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) in the House, prohibited the manufacture, transfer, or possession of semiautomatic assault weapons (SAW). In addition, it set penalties for violations and for use or possession of semiautomatic assault weapons (SAW) during a crime of violence or drug trafficking crime. Also, it required the serial number of any such weapon manufactured after enactment of the bill to clearly show the date on which the weapon was manufactured.[1]

The provisions of the bill were inapplicable to:

  • The transfer or possession of any SAW lawfully possessed on the date of this Act's enactment
  • Certain hunting and sporting firearms
  • The United States or a department or agency of the United States
  • A state or department, agency, or political subdivision of a State
  • The transfer of a SAW by a licensed manufacturer, importer, or dealer to a government entity or to a law enforcement officer authorized to purchase firearms for official use
  • The possession, by an individual who is retired from service with a law enforcement agency and who is not otherwise prohibited from receiving a firearm, of a SAW transferred to the individual by the agency upon such retirement
  • The manufacture, transfer, or possession of a firearm by a licensed manufacturer or importer for purposes of testing or experimentation authorized by the Secretary of the Treasury.[2]

The bill directed the Attorney General to investigate and study the effect of the bill and determine its impact, if any, on violent and drug trafficking crime.[3]

Passage

House

The bill passed in the House on May 5, 1994, 216-214.

House record vote:
To pass the ban

May 5, 1994
Passed, 216-214, view details
Dem: 177-77 in favor, GOP: 38-137 opposed, Ind: 1 in favor

Included in larger anti-crime bill

The provisions of the act were included in the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. This passed by a vote of 235-195 on August 21, 1994.

House record vote:
To pass the anti-crime bill

August 21, 1994
Passed, 235-195, view details
Dem: 188-64 in favor, GOP: 46-131 opposed, Ind: 1 in favor

It passed in the Senate on August 25, 1994.

Senate record vote:
To pass the anti-crime bill

August 25, 1994
Passed, 61-38, view details
Dem: 54-2 in favor, GOP: 7-36 opposed, Ind: 1 opposed

Articles and resources

References

  1. Thomas page on H.R.4296
  2. Thomas page on H.R.4296
  3. Thomas page on H.R.4296

Resources

Related SourceWatch/Congresspedia resources

Articles

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