Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act

From OpenCongress Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

In 2005, the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act was passed, setting forth thousands of transportation spending projects approved for many U.S. communities in most states (total cost of over $200 billion). Despite a majority of funds coming from highway taxes and returned to the states in amounts set by a formula, the original bill sparked much dissent that many of the projects were not directly related to transportation (bike and hiking paths) and others seemed enormously expensive such as the over $200 million approved for a bridge in rural Alaska (often referred to as the "Bridge to Nowhere").[1]

Contents

House

On March 26, 2007, the House considered a bill, (H.R.1195), to amend the 2005 act. It would modify already approved projects, increasing spending for some and decreasing it for others.[2]


Some of the stipulations included:

  • Setting aside $20 million as the maximum spending for maintaining forest roads, along with $1 million for signs identifying public hunting and fishing access and no more than $10 million to facilitate the passage of aquatic species beneath forest roads through culverts, etcetera.[3]
  • Authorization of funding for "idle reduction" facilities on highways is removed. The facilities were intended to give electricity and other support to truckers who would normally idle their vehicles when pulled over to rest, increasing air pollution.[4]
  • Magnetic levitation transportation project funding is set at $20 million for 2007 and $35 million 2008 and 2009 in the form of contract authority.[5]
  • Authorizing an additional $2 million for the National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Commission to study and plan for the future of the nation's surface transportation system.[6]
  • Authorizing grants to states to “conduct the highway safety programs approved including...development and implementation of manpower training programs, and of demonstration programs.”[7]

The bill, sponsored by Rep. James Oberstar (D-Minn.) and cosponsored by Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.), John Duncan (R-Tenn.), and John Mica (R-Fla.),[8] passed in the House by a voice vote.[9]

Senate

Articles and resources

See also

References

  1. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Transportation Security," TheWeekInCongress, March 29, 2007.
  2. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Transportation Security," TheWeekInCongress, March 29, 2007.
  3. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Transportation Security," TheWeekInCongress, March 29, 2007.
  4. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Transportation Security," TheWeekInCongress, March 29, 2007.
  5. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Transportation Security," TheWeekInCongress, March 29, 2007.
  6. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Transportation Security," TheWeekInCongress, March 29, 2007.
  7. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Transportation Security," TheWeekInCongress, March 29, 2007.
  8. "OpenCongress page on H.R. 1195" OpenCongress.
  9. Robert McElroy, "Managing America: Transportation Security," TheWeekInCongress, March 29, 2007.

External resources

External articles

Toolbox