Security and Accountability For Every Port Act of 2006

From OpenCongress Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Summary (how summaries work)

The Security and Accountability For Every Port Act of 2006, or SAFE Port Act, is U.S. law that covers security of ports. Although the Act is non-controversial by itself, Title VIII of the bill (added via conference committee) includes provisions known as the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006, which itself, is highly controversial.



Contents

Action

Passage

The Act was passed at midnight on the day Congress adjourned before the 2006 congressional elections. Though a bill with the gambling wording was previously debated and passed by the House of Representatives, [1][2][3] the SAFE Port Act (H.R. 4954) as passed by the House on May 4 (by a vote of 421-2) and the U.S. Senate on September 14th (98-0),[4] bore no traces of the Unlawful Internet Gambling and Enforcement Act that was included in the SAFE Port Act signed into law by George W. Bush on October 13th, 2006.[5] The UIGEA was added in Conference Report 109-711 (submitted at 9:29pm on September 29 2006), which was passed by the House by a vote of 409-2 and by the Senate by unanimous consent on September 30 2006. Due to H. Res. 1064, the reading of this conference report was waived. (Thomas summary of actions on the bill).

September 14, 2006
Passed, 98-2, view details
Dem: 43-1 in favor, GOP: 54-1 in favor, Ind: 1 in favor

September 30, 2006
Passed, 409-2, with 21 not voting, view details
Dem: 190-1-10 in favor, GOP: 218-1-11 in favor, Ind: 1 in favor

Port security provisions

The SAFE Port Act authorized $6.7 billion to implement a number of programs to improve security of U.S. ports. In addition, it created a Domestic Nuclear Detection Office within the Department of Homeland Security. This agency was charged with inspecting 100% of all cargo containers entering the U.S. for radiation.[6]

The Act also provided that containers from "high-risk" areas be inspected prior to reaching U.S. ports. A portion of the appropriated funds were scheduled to go toward the Integrated Deepwater Program, which is a long-term Coast Guard modernization program.[7] [8]

Investigations of the deepwater program

On May 11 2007, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) will be expanding his congressional investigation of military contracts to include the Coast Guard's Deepwater Program.[9]

Title VIII online gambling provisions

The Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 was added into the bill via conference committee.

Main article: Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006

Controversy and implementation

Although the most controversial aspect of this bill is Title VIII; there has been controversy over whether or not the funding allocated for the Coast Guard's Integrated Deepwater Program, is sufficient to upgrade the fleet.[10] [11]

Articles and resources

See also

References

  1. Transcript of the April 5th hearing
  2. Transcript of July 11th floor speeches on H.R. 4411 - the Internet Gambling Prohibition and Enforcement Act
  3. H.R. 4411 vote record
  4. H.R. 4954 vote record
  5. Nelson Rose: The Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 Analyzed
  6. Robert Malone, Forbes.com: "Bush signs Safe Port Act", Forbes, October, 13, 2006.
  7. Congressional Budget Office analysis of H.R. 4954, prepared April 28, 2006
  8. Renae Merle and Spencer S. Hsu, "Costly Fleet Update Falters Contractors Oversee Coast Guard Project", Washington Post, December 8, 2006.
  9. Kevin Bogardus, "Waxman widens Pentagon probe," The Hill, May 11, 2007.
  10. Congressional Budget Office analysis of H.R. 4954, prepared April 28, 2006
  11. Renae Merle and Spencer S. Hsu, "Costly Fleet Update Falters Contractors Oversee Coast Guard Project", Washington Post, December 8, 2006.

External resources

External articles

Toolbox