User:TimWiseman

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Roll call 48 opposed


Americans for Democratic Action, which opposed the amendment, selected the vote for their 2008 Senate scorecard, where they gave it the following description:

Specter (R-PA) amendment to adjust the budget resolution to reduce the individual alternative minimum tax from its current, more progressive two-rate structure of 26 percent and 28 percent to the single 24 percent rate that was in effect prior to 1993. The revenue loss would not be offset.[1]

Roll call 58 opposed


Americans for Democratic Action, which opposed the amendment, selected the vote for their 2008 Senate scorecard, where they gave it the following description:

Alexander (R-TN) amendment that would shift $670,000 from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to the Department of Education’s English Literacy-Civics Education State Grant program. (The amendment restricts the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from taking enforcement actions against English-only rules in the workplace where the employer’s policy has no business justification.)[2]

Roll call 71 opposed


Americans for Democratic Action, which opposed the amendment, selected the vote for their 2008 Senate scorecard, where they gave it the following description:
Ensign (R-NV) amendment to increase Justice Department funding by $50 million for parental notification law enforcement, with assumed corresponding offsets.[3]

Roll call 80 supported


Americans for Democratic Action, which supported the amendment, selected the vote for their 2008 Senate scorecard, where they gave it the following description:
Boxer (D-CA) amendment to permit legislation allowing pregnant women to be eligible for coverage under the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP).[4]

Roll call 85 supported


Americans for Democratic Action, which supported the resolution, selected the vote for their 2008 Senate scorecard, where they gave it the following description:
Adoption of the concurrent resolution setting broad spending and revenue targets over the next five years (including provisions noted above). The resolution would allow up to $1 trillion in discretionary spending for 2009, including a $35 billion economic stimulus package, a one-year alternative minimum tax “patch,” and allow for the extension of certain 2001 and 2003 tax cuts, including the 10 percent tax bracket and the child tax credit.[5]

Roll call 142 supported


Americans for Democratic Action, which supported the resolution, selected the vote for their 2008 Senate scorecard, where they gave it the following description:
Adoption of the conference report on the concurrent resolution to allow up to $1 trillion in discretionary spending for fiscal 2009, plus $70 billion for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and $5.8 billion for hurricane recovery. It would assume $1.9 trillion in mandatory spending and increase of the statutory debt limit to $10.615 trillion. It would create a “trigger” mechanism that would reinforce pay-as-you-go rules in the House. The measure assumes a one-year alternative minimum tax “patch” that would be offset. It also would require 60 votes to increase the deficit by $10 billion in a year.[6]
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