OpenCongress Blog

Blog Feed Comments Feed More RSS Feeds

How Does the Reconciliation HCR Bill Compare on the Numbers?

March 18, 2010 - by Donny Shaw

After days of delay, the Congressional Budget Office has released their full scoring (.pdf) of the Reconciliation Act of 2010 (H.R.4872) that is designed to bridge the gap between the more conservative Senate version of the health care bill and the progressive House version. The reconciliation bill is designed to strike a balance between the two and, based on the numbers alone, it appears to achieve that, and it even supercedes the oher bills in a couple areas.

The numbers below are all for a ten-year budgeting outlook — they reflect estimates of what kind of impact the bill would have in 2019.

 

 

House Bill
Passed House 11/07/09 by a vote of 220-215

Senate Bill
Passed Senate 12/24/09 by a vote of 60 to 39
Reconciliation Bill
Amends the Senate bill, vote expected in House 3/21
Gross cost of coverage provisions $1.2 trillion
$875 billion  $940 billion
Net savings $138 billion $118 billion  $138 billion
Insurance coverage expansion 36 million more people would have coverage than under current law. In total, 94% of the population would be insured
31 million more people would have coverage than under current law. In total, 92% of the population would be insured  32 million more people would have coverage than under current law. In total, 95% of the population would be insured
Expansion of Medicaid 15 million Americans would be added to Medicaid 15 million Americans would be added to Medicaid 16 million Americans would be added to Medicaid
Number of American who would remain uninsured 18 million 24 million  23 million
Change in employer-provided insurance 6 million more people will get employer coverage 4 million fewer people would have employer coverage than under current law 4 million fewer people would have employer coverage than under current law
Average subsidy for people buying insurance with government aid $6,800 per year $5,800 per year

 $6,000 per year

 

We should have the full text of the reconciliation bill online later today. Stay tuned!

Like this post? Stay in touch by following us on Twitter, joining us on Facebook, or by Subscribing with RSS.