Brian Jones (California)

From OpenCongress Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

This profile of a former 2008 candidate for California's U.S. congressional district 52 is part of the "Wiki the Vote" project.
Wiki the vote tall.gif

Things you can do:

California state flag.png
See all the California members of Congress, candidates and blogs at the California portal.
This article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.
File:Brianjones.jpg
Brian Jones was a Republican candidate for the 52nd Congressional District of California.

Brian Jones was a Republican candidate in the 2008 congressional elections for the 52nd Congressional District (map) of California. He was seeking the Republican nomination for the open seat previously held by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.), but lost a primary race to Hunter's son, Duncan D. Hunter, on June 3, 2008.[1]

Contents

Positions, record and controversies

Bio

In his role as a husband, father, real estate professional, Christian minister and volunteer, and as a member of the Santee City Council, Brian Jones has lived and served witness to the values that have made our country great: God, family and country.

Brian Jones has been a Santee resident since 1978. He attended Santee Elementary, Cajon Park Jr. High, and Santana High School. While attending Santana High School, he actively participated in the Kiwanis' Key Club and water polo and swim teams. In his sophomore year of high school, Brian's parents moved the family to Colorado, where he continued his swimming activities and became president of the Kiwanis' Key Club. After graduating from high school, Brian returned to San Diego to attend San Diego State University and earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration.

As Brian and his wife, Heather, began their family, they purposely chose Santee (Heather also grew up in Santee and is a Santana graduate) as the community in which they wanted to raise their family. Brian and Heather have lived in the same neighborhood for the last twelve years while raising their three children: Christopher 12, Melina 10, and Matthew 8.

Brian has owned and managed businesses in East County and Santee, and he currently serves as a real estate advisor for Diversified Realty Advisors in El Cajon. In addition, Heather and Brian own an interior decorating business in Santee. In the past, Brian managed Primary Focus, the nation's largest non-profit character education assembly program for elementary schools. He also served as a full time staff member at Sonrise Community Church in Santee. As a licensed minister, Brian was responsible for the daily operations of several ministries, including developing and leading a volunteer staff of over 150 adults to serve in the pre-school ministry.

Elected to the Santee City Council in November 2002 and re-elected in 2006, Brian serves as the city's representative on the Mission Trails Regional Park Task Force, City Council and Santee Elementary School District Conference Committee, the Santee Library Committee, the Goodan Ranch Policy Committee, and as a representative on the Metropolitan Transit Services Board. Prior to his election to the Santee City Council, he was a member of SPARC (Santee Parks and Recreation Committee) and served as a commissioner on the Mobile Home Fair Practices Commission.

Brian's service at Santee City Hall has allowed him the unique opportunity to help design and implement a bright vision for the city's future. Through Brian's leadership, Santee has become one of the safest, most family-oriented communities in our region. As a Vice Mayor and City Councilman, Brian led the city's planning and approval of new retail projects, the Town Center Corporate Campus, long awaited move-up housing and the new YMCA Aquatic Center and Santee Sports Park. In addition, the assessed property value in Santee increased by $1 billion, a 25% increase, in just four years.

Through these real-life private and public sector experiences, Brian Jones has developed the strong convictions he holds in free market principals and the need for government reform to eliminate red tape and reduce taxes. His experience as a local elected official has strengthened his resolve to restore local decision making and bring our tax monies home from Washington, D.C. to meet local needs.

Brian respects the foundation of this Nation and the sacrifices that have been paid from the founding of our country to today with those serving in Iraq, Afghanistan and around the world. This country was founded on Godly principles and Brian will fight to protect our Godly heritage and return those principles to the public square.

Brian Jones has been endorsed by many church, community, business and political leaders in East County. Brian is a member of Board of Directors for Boys and Girls Club. He is also a member of the South Bay Rod and Gun Club, and in his spare time, he enjoys mountain biking, off-roading, swimming and playing with his family.

Brian Jones recently announced that he will actively seek the Republican nomination for Congress in the 52nd District, pledging, "The values we share – God, family and country - are under attack today from liberals in the United States Congress. I will stand up for these values every day, because they are not only the values that made our country great, but they are the values which will allow our country to overcome its enemies and provide prosperity to the good people of East County and all Americans."

2008 elections

Powell was seeking the Republican nomination for the open seat previously held by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.), but lost a primary race to Hunter's son, Duncan D. Hunter, on June 3, 2008.[1]

Money in politics

Information on this candidate's 2008 fundraising is not yet available. Stay tuned for live feeds of data from the Center for Responsive Politics' OpenSecrets.org site.

Committees and affiliations

Committees

Jones will be assigned committees if and when he is elected to Congress.

Affiliations

More background data

Contact

Articles and resources

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "California 2008 General Election", TheGreenPapers.com, retrieved June 6, 2008

External resources

External articles

Toolbox