Congressional actions to authorize national monuments and memorials

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In the U.S., both Congress and the president can take the initiative in establishing national monuments and memorials. [1] While federal funds may not be used to support such sites in the District of Columbia, Congress may authorize a particular project and grant an organization the right to proceed with it. This page documents legislation directing the creation or expansion of national monuments and memorials. [2]

Contents

110th Congress

House

Memorial authorized to commemorate Revolutionary War Gen. Francis Marion

On March 5, 2007, the House passed a bill authorizing the Marion Park Project. The project would establish a memorial in the District of Columbia to honor Brigadier General Francis Marion. Marion, known as the “Swamp Fox,” commanded the Williamsburg militia in South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. [3]

Prior to the bill, Marion Park existed in Washington D.C., but lacked a formal commemoration of Marion himself. An organization called the Palmetto Conservative Foundation backed the effort to create one, and this bill would grant it the authority to do so. [4]

The bill was sponsored by Rep. Joe Wilson (R-S.C.), and passed 390-0. [5]


Articles and resources

See also

References

  1. The National Park Trust: What the American public should know about national parks and monuments
  2. Robert McElroy, " Managing America: Public Land," TheWeekInCongress, March 9, 2007.
  3. Robert McElroy, " Managing America: Public Land," TheWeekInCongress, March 9, 2007.
  4. Robert McElroy, " Managing America: Public Land," TheWeekInCongress, March 9, 2007.
  5. Robert McElroy, " Managing America: Public Land," TheWeekInCongress, March 9, 2007.

External resources

External articles

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